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Rollei Infrared (120, 400 iso) User-Review

The luminous wonder for the frenzied pictures you'll every made!

Some weeks ago I bought a film bundle at LSI-Store. As the package arrived there was this curious medium format film inside. Black and white and infrared? I thought of greenish pictures like infrared cameras make, but I searched for the film in the internet and saw some stunning pictures.

I loaded this film into my Diana F+ and went out for a walk through a graveyard and across a crazy backyard. When I got home, I recognised that I used the entire roll! Immediately I walked down to my favourite photographic laboratory, cause I was so exicted, I won’t wait any longer to see the results! One day later as I scanned the film, the pictures blew me away.The contrast is stunning and I love this special “aura”, that glows in my shots. I love the pictures of the statues in the graveyard, they almost look like phenomenons.

But here are some tips:
- Don’t be afraid try to overexpose the film, you will get more of those “aura”
- Maybe used with a red filter to increase the special effect
- Shoot at shiny days, this is no film for cloudy ones

I really like this film and I can’t wait to see new results!

written by stinketier

13 comments

  1. lolfox

    lolfox

    Great pics and and interesting looking film, but can someone tell me if there is something in the photo rulebook that says when you use infrared film it is obligatory to take photos of graveyards.

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  2. stinketier

    stinketier

    yes on page 76... ;-)

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  3. stouf

    stouf

    Beautiful graveyard shots ! ; )

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  4. vicuna

    vicuna

    wow, beautiful gallery!! And of course, IR film can be shot outside of graveyards, but it gives such a stunning effect to the statues and mood...!!

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  5. azurblue

    azurblue

    Wow stinketier, your pics are great !

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  6. dogma

    dogma

    Great film! love it does!

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  7. breakphreak

    breakphreak

    which filters had you used, if I may ask please?

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  8. adbigmilk

    adbigmilk

    I heard you have to use a special filter for infrared films, is that true ?

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  9. stinketier

    stinketier

    I did not use any kind of filter, but i heared that a red filter should increase the infrared effect. So the next time i will try it, but like you see it also works without!

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  10. herbert-4

    herbert-4

    Find a Hoya R72 opaque red filter, for strongest IR effect. I wrote an elaborate review of Efke 820ir film in Lomography Magazine Films a while ago. I put everything I know on the subject in it. Have a look, Then do it again. Enjoy.

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  11. breakphreak

    breakphreak

    yep, looks cool, but without a filter there is no dramatic difference between a regular b/w and an infrared film

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  12. underaglassbell

    You do realise to utilise this film for the "aura” effect you need to use an Infrared Filter; at the LEAST you need to use a Red filter to delve into the IR of the film. - Not using a IR or indeed any filter is just going to result in normal B&W negatives, basically the same as if you use Ilford SFX without a filter. - They are designed so that they can be used normally with our a filter and at the same time give IR effect IF, IF you use the correct filters. So I'm sorry by just Overexposing the film you have not got the “aura” effect, you have just overexposed the film and got normal black and white shots. NOT infrared.
    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  13. abbym

    abbym

    infra red is great, find best results in bright day light conditions! if you don't own a red filter, get some red cellophane and fashon a filter over your lense. try srewing up the cellophane and then covering your lense for some interesting light effects!
    almost 5 years ago · report as spam