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Ilford XP2 (120, 400 iso) staff-review

If you need exceptionally small grain and spot-on pinprick sharpness, then this film is your ticket. On top of that, it can be processed in normal C41 chemicals - meaning that even the el cheapo lab or supermarket down the road can develop this film at their usual rock-bottom price. If there is a more penny-saving way of shooting creatively and easily with B&W, we haven't found it.

If you need exceptionally small grain and spot-on pinprick sharpness, then this film is your ticket. On top of that, it can be processed in normal C41 chemicals – meaning that even the el cheapo lab or supermarket down the road can develop this film at their usual rock-bottom price. If there is a more penny-saving way of shooting creatively and easily with B&W, we haven’t found it.

It is a sharp and fast black and
white film. It can be used for any photographic subject, but ensures excellent results when there is a wide subject brightness range and gives exceptionally sharp, crisp prints. The excellent highlights and improved shadows of this film give enhanced negative contrast for optimum black and white
print quality.

Ilford XP2, according to my local pro-lab is the best and really only good c-41 black and white film currently on the market. It consists of 2 film layers, one for capturing deep shadows and the other designed for capturing bright highlights as to not blow them out. Ilford claims that the film can be rated from 50-800 ISO, making the film absolutely forgiving. Of all the black and white films that I’ve encountered XP2 lets me get away with bad exposures the best. There is no pushing or pulling of developing times necessary. This film will let you shoot in so many different circumstances and get decent results. I love it and rarely shoot anything else in my Diana + or Holga. The price is also lower than most any other black and white films, and c-41 developing also costs less. So if budgeting is an issue you can shoot more, spend less and still shoot more!” – janisthewanis

Gallery credits:

photos 26-34 by janisthewanis

written by fookshit

6 comments

  1. xbalboax

    xbalboax

    couldn't agree more, i just love XP2

    almost 6 years ago · report as spam
  2. graefin

    graefin

    uiii, some of my pictures are there in this gallery ;)

    almost 6 years ago · report as spam
  3. graefin

    graefin

    11 of them *wow*

    almost 6 years ago · report as spam
  4. roryeaglestone

    AMEN! possibly my faourite film! I do alot of street photography with my minox and this film suits it perfectly! I agree with how forgiving this film is too, especially in the overexposing department! I would use this over any other B&W film, even without it's ease of processing. Interestingly, some labs leave it a slightly warmer brown colour, whilst some a colder blue tone!
    almost 6 years ago · report as spam
  5. andys

    Regarding the blue/brown tone business, I've noticed this and wondered if it was the development or the scanning of negs that did this. Any ideas? I prefer the brown myself.
    almost 6 years ago · report as spam
  6. pangmark

    pangmark

    Thanks everybody. No b&w processing labs in my town so, guess what my next film purchase'll be?

    about 3 years ago · report as spam