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Photographer's Photobook Project Aims to Document US National Parks Through Pinhole Snaps

A San Francisco-based photographer plans to take on a challenging project to photograph some of the mighty national parks and historic sites that dot the American landscape. Her goal is to produce not near-perfect photographs with almost unrealistic sharpness, but lo-fi snaps taken using a pinhole camera.

Photo via Kickstarter

Earlier this month, San Francisco photographer Ashley Erin Somers began a Kickstarter campaign that hopes to fund her dream to publish a fine art photography book, featuring her black and white snaps of national parks and historic spots dotting California to Florida. Her weapon of choice for this project? Pinhole cameras that she made herself.

If she succeeds in securing the $10,000 funding, Somers hopes to start her 37-day photography trip soon after the campaign ends this October 5th, or even earlier. Having done shoots in Yosemite, Yellowstone, and other parks, she hopes to visit other notable locations such as Joshua Tree National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, and The Alamo for the project.

While Somers says she has had more than 12 years of experience with film photography, she also mentions the risks that come with traditional black and white film photography. You know, just so backers know what could go wrong, and possibly, where the money will most likely go to, aside from the travel expenses — enough supplies to ensure she gets back with impressive photographs worthy of publishing in a book.

“Digital photography lets you check as soon as you shoot and gives you the opportunity to take as many as you want, at low cost, until you get it right. With shooting film, it is possible for me to get back from the trip, and after developing it, realize I haven’t taken as many extraordinary shots as I expected. There’s even a chance of enormous uh-ohs, such as boxes of film getting accidentally fogged by light, or our car breaking down.”

Some have commented that Somers’ venture features locations that have already been heavily photographed, and may even be a vacation disguised as a photography project. What about you, what do you think of her project and other similar endeavors?

All information for this article were sourced from Kickstarter and PetaPixel.

written by plasticpopsicle

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