Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

Nat Geo Celebrates 125 Years of Iconic Photography with Christie's Online Auction

The National Geographic Society's magazine, with its famed yellow border, is one of the most recognizable publications in the world and the photographs they've put on their covers belong to an iconic roster of images representing life on Earth for over a century. Do I hear bids starting at $1,000?

Tuning into highly informative documentaries on the National Geographic channel is one of the best things you can do for your brain when you end up couch-potatoing in front of the TV. The world we live in is so enormous and it’s so interesting and entertaining to see how everyone and everything manages to coexist. Thankfully, even before we had the telly, Nat Geo was already on the forefront of showcasing species and spaces via our favourite medium: photography.

Since 1888, National Geographic magazine has brought the people and places of our immense planet into the homes – and imaginations – of millions of readers. Printed in 37 languages, and instantly recognizable by the yellow-bordered cover, the magazine is revered for its world-class imagery, showcasing the talents of its intrepid photographers. For this exclusive, online-only sale, Christie’s and National Geographic have selected 125 iconic pictures in celebration of National Geographic’s 125th anniversary. A selection of the proceeds will go toward preserving the archives from which these images were drawn.

Jou Jou and Dr. Jane Goodall, Brazzaville Zoo, Republic of Congo, 1990. Photo by Michael Nichols

The touch — an exquisite moment for Jane Goodall — came when a chimpanzee she had never seen before reached out his hand to hers. The old male had been caged alone for years in an African zoo. “He’s desperate for contact with other living beings,” Goodall says […] Drawing on her un-paralleled understanding of chimps in the wild, Goodall comforted and quieted the raging animal. — National Geographic, 1992

Top-notch images are already going between hundreds to thousands of dollars, so if you want to own a piece of Nat Geo history, better place your bids before the hammer falls on July 29th. The society has definitely done their part in in inspiring people to care about the planet and we hope they continue to do this for many centuries more!

You might also like:

written by denisesanjose

No comments yet, be the first