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$10,000,000 for 3 Leica Cameras

Anyway you look at it, that's a lot of money. But it's a pretty a good deal for some historical Leica cameras, don't you think? Money is no object for these limited edition units from serial productions that were once owned by some of the most influential industry lensmen. See the M3D, Luxus Leica, and MP that went for €8,240,000.

Here’s an extravagant way to spend your cold hard cash: attend the WestLicht Photographic Auction and bid on one of the rare Leicas that once belonged to the likes of Robert Capa.

Just a few days ago, LIFE photographer David Douglas Duncan’s M3D went under the hammer for €1,680,000 ($2M+). It now merits the title as “the most expensive camera from a serial production ever sold” and is also “the second-highest price ever paid for a camera.” The top record belongs to the Leica 0-Series that went for €2,160,000 last summer.

Meanwhile, the gold-plated Luxus Leica sold for €1,020,000 ($1M+), the first serial-production M3—formerly owned by Leitz engineer Willi Stein—sold for €900,000, three of Magnum photographer Paul Fusco’s Leica MPs sold for €858,000, and the the first Leica owned by Capa was sold to the tune of €78,000. According to WestLicht, 92% of the cameras on auction were sold and total sales added up to €8,240,000 ($10M+). That’s money well spent on pieces of photographic history—and they probably still work, too.

Sourced from The British Journal of Photography.

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written by denisesanjose

2 comments

  1. lokified

    lokified

    Ooh. I've seen one that looks like that second camera in my local second-hand camera shop. It was gorgeous & I wouild have bought it, bar the A$580 price tag... and the Luftwaffe symbol embossed on the leather. *loosen collar*

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  2. sharpwaveripple

    Almost certainly a fake. The WWII leica issue sell for a stratospheric price, and It was noticed by unscrupulous people who converted old Zorkis into fake Leicas... Bizarrely, there is now a trade in these fakes, as they stopped being produced by the end of the 90s!
    about 1 month ago · report as spam

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Nederlands.