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Interview with Artist David Amichai

We asked local artist David Amichai to design us a one of a kind DIY Sardina. The finished product sits proudly in our New York City location, but we wanted to get to know the artist a little better. So we asked David a few questions about his work and his influences.

Tell us a little about yourself. What do you do? What are your passions?
I’m a filmmaker, based above The Little Lebowski shop in Greenwich Village. I moved to NY a couple years ago after cycling cross-country and took a job as a messenger for a bit to learn the city (was a ton of fun for a while but got sick of getting hit by cabs). I’m all for any experience that’ll drag me out of my comfort zone. I’d say I’m pretty passionate about finding new and exciting ways to feel uncomfortable.

What made you decide to be an artist?
I’ve been completely in love with film since mastering the sly art of post bedtime tv binging. Being a bit of a punk in school I’d spend a bunch of time in the office just sitting there, reenacting scenes with glue sticks. I’d watch Fight Club every day after school for what must have been a month, mulling over every shot, I was seriously obsessed. There really wasn’t anything else I wanted to do aside from making / watching movies, homework especially.

After moving to NY there was a period where I tried other things, partly out of interest, mostly for the money. I bussed tables in a fancy pants French restaurant long enough to get attached, and break all their wineglasses. So I got fired, decided once and for all I’m just gonna be some sort of goddamn filmmaker, and then ate an entire box of rugelach.

What influences you and your art?
Living in NY is a big one. I read a Salinger interview with the same question, his answer was just an insanely long list of authors he liked. That’s probably the way to go.

I think it come down to this though. I used to walk around the park by my house as a kid imagining I was in an enormous snow globe. Everything in it’s right place, nice and pretty. I’d pretend a giant came by and just shook it so hard everything including me got mixed up into a big floating mess with no form whatsoever. So I wasn’t even me anymore, every bit was combined with the rest of the stuff in the park. Just one big swirling mess of what used to be grass and swing sets and a little Jewish boy. Then it would all settle back to normal as if nothing ever happened. I feel like anything I make is in some way an attempt at reenacting, and explaining that feeling. So far I haven’t even come close.

How long have you been interested in Lomography and what do you love about it?
Ever since you guys tricked me into it with all that free wine at your events. I actually ended up making a video with all the candy stuffed into my bag that night. You can view it here

I’m still trying to get over the fact that we can put up an image and give us the sense we’re seeing out of someone else’s head. I’m hopelessly OCD in the way I shoot, everything’s got to be squared off; the whole philosophy of shooting from the hip is exciting to me. It’s great to just let the camera take on a mind (and DIY body) of it’s own.

Tell us about the DIY Sardina you created.
Well, I just ripped off my design I used on my website. The goal was to have it look ordered but feel kind of insane. I’ve never actually done anything like this before, most of what I do is motion graphics or photography, so the simplicity of the design really worked with the amount of time I had.

What is your latest project?
I’m working on a multiscreen mograph display. I can’t really say much about it at the moment. I’ve been helping out on a friend’s documentary, The Little Lotus Project, when I can. It’s about a group of international graffiti artists helping out at an orphanage in northern Thailand.
Here’s a link if you’d like to check it out here

A big thanks to David for giving us a little tour of his artistic mind and taking the time to create a really fun DIY Sardina. See some of David’s other work on his website.

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written by lomographynyc

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Français.