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Analogue, Digital & You: Boys vs. Girls

Among the 5676 responses we had to the recent Analogue, Digital and You survey, 48% of the people were male and 52% were female. Using the data, we decided to go through the responses and compare how male and female Lomgoraphers view the world. This experiment showed some very interesting distinctions between the Lomo boys and girls. Read on for details!

Photo by miriel

Lomographic Habits

Among the responses to the Analogue, Digital and You questionnaire, 90% of girls own at least 1 Lomography camera whilst only 84% of boys do. Of those people who do own a camera, 18% of girls own more than 5 cameras and 24% of boys do. The stats also showed some distinctions about our favorite cameras. Whilst the Diana F+ proved to be the most popular camera among both boys and girls, a much higher percentage of girls (25%) rated it top compared to boys (16%). Similarly, the La Sardina was loved more by girls (9%) than by guys (5%); but boys (11%) rated the original LC-A much higher than girls (4%).

In terms of shooting Lomography, there were also some differences. Whilst 16% of boys said they shoot a lot of analogue photos every day, only 10% of girls said they do this. And while 6% of guys shoot 10 or more rolls a month, only 2% of girls say they do this.

Photo by endorphin

Life Outside Lomography

Reading was an interesting point of difference between female and male Lomographers. 18% of girls said they read books a lot every day, but only 11% of boys said this was true for them. This would also explain why 55% of girls said that reading brings them a lot of happiness but only 38% of boys agreed. When we asked whether you would rather read a book or watch TV, the majority of both boys and girls agreed that they would prefer to read. But this majority was made up of only 74% boys against 82% girls. And when we asked whether you would buy a book in a store or online, again the majority agreed on going to a bookstore; but this figure was based on 81% of boys against 86% girls.

Whilst girls were super-keen on reading, the same could not be said of computer games. 40% of girls said that playing computer games brings them no happiness, whist only 30% of boys said this. Boys also seem to be more into analogue music – 48% of male Lomographers (against 40% female) play an acoustic instrument and 22% of males (against 16% of females) say that their favorite way to listen to music is on vinyl.

Photo by endorphin

Digital Stats

Finally, there were also some interesting discrepancies between how males and females view digital technology. Again, in most cases, boys and girls leant the same way as a majority, but the percentage figure fluctuated in some notable instances. For example, whilst 36% of boys said they would be able to go more than a week without using their mobile, only 29% of girls said they could. And asked to imagine a case where you left home and realized you has forgotten your mobile, 23% of girls said they would feel disorientated and only 18% of boys said this would be so for them. On the other hand, 16% of boys said they would feel relieved to have left their mobile, whilst only 11% of girls asserted this.

There was also a contrast in how boys and girls spend their time on the internet. 44% of females said they spend a lot of time on social media sites every day; but 6% fewer men said that they do this. And 55% of the boys said that they spend a lot of time every day surfing the internet, whilst 7% fewer females said that they do this.

Please Note: The statistics shown here are based on the results of the Lomography Analogue, Digital and You questionnaire. There were 5676 replies to the questionnaire and participants from 82 countries.

written by tomas_bates

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Spanish, Deutsch, Italiano & 日本語.