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Is this the Second Known Photograph of Emily Dickinson?

Attention, literature lovers and photography history buffs! There's a photo making rounds in the Internet, supposedly the second known photo of American poet Emily Dickinson. Could this be the real deal? Check it out after the jump!

Photo via Wikipedia

Until some days ago, there was only one known photograph of American poet Emily Dickinson: a daguerreotype taken sometime in late 1846 or early 1847 at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary. The photo (above) shows a frail-looking teen-aged Dickinson, which fit the common belief that she was a recluse who never left the house and only communicated with her friends via letters.

The lady at the left of the daguerreotype above is believed to be Emily Dickinson, aged 30 at the time it was taken. Photo via Time NewsFeed

However, in the photo circulating around the Web these past few days, we see a rather healthy-looking 30-year old Emily sitting beside a friend, Kate Scott Turner. The circa 1860 daguerreotype, now believed to be the second known photograph of the reserved American poetess, was first picked up by a collector in 1995 in Springfield, Massachusetts. Twelve years later, the photo was brought to Amherst College (where Dickinson studied for seven years) and since then, academics have been investigating its origins.

Last month, the Emily Dickinson International Society held a conference in Cleveland, Ohio and showcased the daguerreotype photo for the first time. There’s no definitive answer yet confirming if it is indeed Emily Dickinson in the photo, but Amherst College’s archive and special collections department head Mike Kelly said, “I think we can get beyond reasonable doubt.”

How about you, do you think the photo is the real deal? Do you see any resemblance between the two photos? Tell us with a comment below!

All information for this article were sourced from Time NewsFeed.

Also, if you’re into literature stuff, you must also like read The Analogue Reader articles!

written by plasticpopsicle

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