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Bang Bang! Photos Captured As Bullet Destroys Camera

There's a big difference between shooting WITH a camera and shooting AT a camera, but photographer Steven Pippin thought it was a good idea to do both--literally and simultaneously. Read more to see the rare images from a camera after taking a bullet shot and the science behind how the artist did it.

In an interview with Wired, Pippin explained:

To take the photos, the camera and gun are put into rigs lined up with each other. The gun has a piezo electric sensor mounted close to the chamber so that as soon as the shot fires, a signal goes to a timer of delay unit and then to a high speed flash (1/140,000 second flash duration). Before the gun is directed at the camera, it is calibrated using four or five shots to make sure that the timer is adjusted to make sure that the bullet is at the point of impact when the flash is triggered.

Once it’s ready, the room is left in total darkness with the film loaded and the shutter open before the trigger is pulled. The film is then retrieved from the broken camera and the lights turned back on.

Pippin added that tougher cameras, such as the Russian Zenith or Leicas, can withstand a several hits before completely collapsing. Why anyone would destroy perfectly good cameras, we’re not sure but for art’s sake, why not?

See Pippin’s current exhibition, RESISTANCE at The Fine Art Society Contemporary in London from April 18, 2012 to May 5, 2012.

Sources include Petapixel and Wired

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written by denisesanjose

2 comments

  1. jeffr

    jeffr

    "why anyone would destroy perfectly good cameras" - my thoughts exactly and i honestly don't think it's worth it even "for art's sake." that's just a waste

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. detroitlomo

    detroitlomo

    maybe to show how durable old cameras are, when in comparison to newer ones that break if they get a little water sprayed on them

    over 2 years ago · report as spam