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John Waters Has a LomoKino

The LomoKino is in the hands of one of the most admired cult directors: John Waters. Read on for some curiosities of this genius of the cinema and watch him with his new camera.

C: – I have something for you, but only if you like analogue.
J. W.: – Yeeessssss, I love analogue!

Given that response, Cripeka could only do one thing. For her it was a great honor to give a LomoKino to this this cinematographic transgressor, who was delighted to recive the Lomography movie maker.

Curiosities of genius:

  • His favorite childhood memory was seeing real blood on the seat of a wrecked car when visiting a scrap yard and fantasizing about lethal car crashes.
  • As a youth, he would watch adult-only films at the local drive-in, with binoculars.
  • He is obsessed with true-crime and used to regularly attend gory trials all over the US, where he often saw the same faces in the public galleries.
  • Subscribes to more than 80 magazines. Also goes to see just about every movie that comes out and hardly ever rents movies.
  • Grew his thin pencil-line mustache in honor of Little Richard.
  • All his movies are set in Baltimore.
  • Frequently casts Patricia Hearst.
  • Casts Mink Stole in nearly all of his films.
  • Films combine outrageous subject matter with a sense of humor.

Growing up in Baltimore in the 1950s, John Waters was not like other children; he was obsessed by violence and gore, both real and on the screen. With his weird counter-culture friends as his cast, he began making silent 8mm and 16mm films in the mid-‘60s; he screened these in rented Baltimore church halls to underground audiences drawn by word of mouth and street leafleting campaigns. As his filmmaking grew more polished and his subject matter more shocking, his audiences grew bigger, and his write-ups in the Baltimore papers more outraged. By the early 1970s he was making features, which he managed to get shown in midnight screenings in art cinemas by sheer perseverance. Success came when Pink Flamingos (1972) – a deliberate exercise in ultra-bad taste – took off in 1973, helped no doubt by lead actor Divine’s infamous dog-crap eating scene.

Waters continued to make low-budget shocking movies with his Dreamland repertory company until Hollywood crossover success came with Hairspray, fiebre de los 60 (1988), and although his movies nowadays might now appear cleaned up and professional, they retain Waters’ playfulness, and reflect his lifelong obsessions.

“If someone threw up at one of my screenings, it would be like a standing ovation.”, John Waters.

The source used for this article was IMDB.

Enter a new analogue dimension with the LomoKino. Lomography’s own 35mm analogue movie camera allows you to capture action and immortalize your story on film! Shoot 144 frames on any 35mm film and create your own cinematic masterpieces. Want to watch your movie the old-school way? We also offer the LomoKino and LomoKinoscope package!

written by lomographyembassyspain and translated by susielomovitz

2 comments

  1. superlighter

    superlighter

    next time I wanna born john waters!

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. jenjo

    jenjo

    think of the possibilities. i really hopes he makes a mini movie with the kino.
    over 2 years ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

The original version of this article is written in: Spanish.