Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

In The Shop: Dijital Fix

Interview with David Auerbach, owner of Dijital Fix, a design & electronics boutique in the heart of Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Dijital Fix, the design & electronics boutique of choice for the Williamsburg area in Brooklyn, NY is the place to go for awesome items that balance cutting edge design with make-your-life-easier functionality. Whether you’re a digital or analog kinda guy/gal, this place has got you covered with covetable accessories, gorgeous goods for audio junkies, genius computer companions, and of course, the latest Lomographic goodies. We wanted to know more about the man behind the counter and the neighborhood it is nestled in.

NAME: David Auerbach
LOCATION: Dijital Fix, 218 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211
OCCUPATION: Design/Electronics Boutique Owner
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To bring the best in design, and styletronics that we can get our hands on, and play with it all (sell it too).

Best spot in Brooklyn for shutter bugs?

One of my favorite spots is definitely in the fast-disappearing warehouse areas of Williamsburg, but there is also an abundance of photo opportunities out in the Bushwick/East Williamsburg border area. Derelict buildings, storage areas tagged with spray-paint an inch thick… It’s what brought me to the neighborhood initially and I still love it.

Coolest gadget to come out in 09?
Personally, I’m SUPER excited about the Diana Instant Back, but other than that, we just got in these awesome analogue DIY synthesizers called the Gakken SX-150. It’s funny, the coolest “new” things to us aren’t always the most “hi-tech” or advanced, and are often based on very old ideas, but brought into new light by people who revive them in fresh new ways. That synthesizer is one example, as is almost every Lomography camera!

Best place to grab a drink and relax in your hood?
Iona’s (on Grand Street) is one of my favorite spots. It’s not too loud, they have a great backyard with a ping pong table and a fire “pit”. You may come out smelling like campfire, but in a way, that’s part of the charm.

If you were a Lomography camera, which would you be and why?
I would probably be the LC-A+. Despite being the proprietor of a fancy electronics store, I’m surprisingly not all that into technology in the sense that I need to own the latest stuff all the time (in my personal life). I wear a $25 casio watch that I’ve had for 7 years, and don’t generally buy something just because it’s newer (Apple computers excluded ;-). I tend to prefer things that work well, have been time-tested, and are built solid to last for a long time. Technology these days is so fickle, changes constantly, and isn’t generally designed to last very long. The LC-A+ is a camera which has just enough electronics inside it to make it function well, but not so much that you have to spend time reading a manual or fixing broken knobs, etc… It’s a solid camera that can take plenty of abuse, and will definitely stand the test of time. My tastes fall within the motto: “Utilitarian but functional and nice looking”. I think it fits pretty well.

What is the nerdiest question you’ve ever been asked in the shop?
“Is that fishtank a speaker?” is probably the most-asked one that we get. We have a fish-tank in the store that looks unlike most fish-tanks you see. We also carry speakers. Somehow this results in people assuming that an object filled with water and fish must in fact be a speaker. I don’t know…not so much nerdy as it is hilarious.

If Brooklyn had a theme song for its opening credits, what would it be?
Souls of Mischief – Cab Fare

What’s the weirdest Lomographic moment you’ve ever had?
I really don’t have one with Lomos…but I’ve got plenty with other cameras!

What is one secret about Brooklyn that very few know?
The G Train is actually awesome!

All time favorite book?
The Lucifer Principle by Howard Bloom

THE person you would most want to photograph?
Leonardo da Vinci in his workshop

David’s Advice of the Day:
Lomography cameras can be tough in the beginning, especially if you’ve never used a manual film camera before, but just give it a few rolls and you’ll be all set! The results will be more exciting and unexpected than any digital camera could ever be.

Check out some sweet shots by David and his crew in and around their Brooklyn hood using the Fisheye, the LC-A+, the Diana F+, and the Lubitel+:

written by jeffmoore

4 comments

  1. kylewis

    kylewis

    Great pics!

    over 5 years ago · report as spam
  2. kazarareta

    kazarareta

    great interview as well!

    over 5 years ago · report as spam
  3. stouf

    stouf

    Yeah ! This is very nice !

    over 5 years ago · report as spam
  4. laura_jacqueline

    laura_jacqueline

    Great Shots Dave!!!
    over 5 years ago · report as spam