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Lomography and Meow City, Kuching

The first moment I stepped into Kuching International Airport, I was jumping up and down with excitement. It was the first time my friends and I visited Kuching, the capital city of Sarawak.

“Meow,” I said to this city.
“Meow Meow,” the city replied.

The sun was bright enough for my film camera to work.

The most popular street in Kuching is known as Carpenter Street. This is a good place to buy for souvenirs, handicrafts, and that ‘I love Kuching’ T-shirt at cheap prices.

Then, we boarded a sampan across Sarawak River reaching Boyan Village.

I met a friendly family here, a father with two daughters. They invited me to his guesthouse named as My Village Barok Guesthouse, which is a special guesthouse indeed. I promised myself to come back again for the next time I visit.

One of the interesting historical buildings is the Square Tower. It was built in 1879 as a detention camp for prisoners, and was later converted into a fortress, and then a dance hall. Today, it is a multimedia information centre and video theatre providing information on Sarawak’s tourist attractions.

Finally, you can reach the Kuching Waterfront which is now transformed into a landscaped esplanade. You can take a leisurely stroll along the Waterfront to explore its historical buildings and admire the modern sculptures. Believe me, the dusk view here is breathtaking.

The highlight of this trip definitely is this bridge. I almost couldn’t believe that I dropped my Fisheye No.2 camera from the bridge into the sea!

The day I left Kuching, I looked back; I’m gonna to miss you, the blue sky, bridge and my camera.

written by alive13

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Deutsch & Nederlands.