Petzval_preorder_header_kit

Now Available for Pre-Order - First Come, First Served

Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

The Dingle Turns 100

The Dingle Memorial Tower is a large, four-sided, slightly-tapered structure situated in a prominent location on a knoll, overlooking the shores of the North West Arm of Halifax in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. On Natal Day this year, we went and explored the Tower and its beautiful surroundings to celebrate its 100th birthday.

Donated by Sir Sandford Fleming to the people of Halifax in 1908, the 95-acre park consists of wooded and open areas, a hilly terrain, saltwater frontage on the arm, large freshwater ponds, numerous paths, small beaches, and the Dingle Memorial Tower. The Tower was finished in 1912, and is a prominent local landmark and a popular spot for wedding pictures.

Sir Sandford Fleming was quite a prominent figure in Canadian history, everything from designing the first postage stamp to being Engineer in Chief for the Canadian Pacific Railway. He became internationally famous for establishing Universal Stardard Time, which was universally adopted in 1884.

The donation of the land to the people of Halifax was made to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the establishment of the representative government in Nova Scotia in 1758. Fleming’s proposal to construct a memorial tower was endorsed by the City of Halifax and the local Canadian Club who raised funds for the tower. Donations were received from many places within the Empire and plaques commemorating the gifts, and stones from the countries of the Empire, were placed on the interior walls. The site is of heritage value due to the long-standing public use of the park for recreation and leisure.

The tower itself is made from granite and ironstone from a quarry in the nearby Purcells Cove, and the top is made from copper. Two large, bronze, lions located at the foot of the tower might look familiar if you’ve ever visited Trafalgar Square. They were donated by the Royal Colonial Institute of London in 1913, and were designed by British sculptor Albert Brucejoy whose design was influenced by the monumental lions at Trafalgar Square in London.

After visiting and learning about the Tower, we took it easy and drove down by the water for awhile, eventually stopping and getting ice cream in a spot probably close to where they got the materials to make the tower, finished 100 years ago.

Some information taken from Historic Places.ca.

2 comments

  1. rbruce63

    rbruce63

    Thanks for this geographically interesting and important article of Halifax! I like the patina of the pictures but would like to see more crispness in them! However for this article, I do not grow accustomed yet to the red scale film! What kind of camera did you use?

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  2. erinwoodgatesphotography

    erinwoodgatesphotography

    @rbruce63 all of these redscales were taken on my Yashica Zoomtec

    over 1 year ago · report as spam

Where is this?

Nearby popular photos – see more

Nearby LomoLocations