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Bergamo Sole: A Quiet Place to Play with Rythm, Geometries and Shadows

A few weeks ago I spent the weekend in my hometown. I took my bike out for a spin and went looking for a place to test out black and white film on my Canon, and this apartment block came to my mind. This housing complex was a project by architects G. Gambirasio and G. Zenoni at the end of the seventies and it's characterized by its red bricks' and regular geometry.

Photo by elisss

It is situated in via Carducci, Bergamo. There’s an opening at the side so you can come in from the street.

A bit of “technical” information:

The complex has about 2,000 inhabitants and covers an area of 5 hectares. Planimetrically is set according to a rectangular shape with the long side parallel to the main access road. The houses, all single level, are made in two basic patterns of plants (L-shaped and U-shaped) that generate all possible variations. The result is therefore, that type of house to patio, private garden which can be split between two homes in L aggregate, or belonging to a single unit in the form of a U. The space between housing and the other is a distribution network of walkways that originate on one side, the mind from the main road opposite the parking area. Part of the reserved cars is also obtained under the plate on which the houses stand, allowing the complex to assume a trend in spite of the terraced land on which it is born is flat. The composition was completed on the south by a four-story building with the same intended use that term to the upper town, the geometry of the complex. The materials used are mainly concrete and facing brick and the terracotta roofs of the houses in the patio.

I chose that location for experimenting black and white photography because I think it’s just perfect if you want to focus on shapes and shadows more than on colour.

Some walkaways and stairs make lovely symmetries that you can’t ignore. Their inclination makes it’s sense of profundity more evident, thanks to the repetition of the same module, too.

It’s also cool to see how people tried to personalize their entrance: postal drawers, flowers, vases and plates.

Rails, banisters, and winding staircases create great shadows games.

At least, I am in love with the minimal cement and rude vases.

Bergamo Sole is a classic place that you’ve seen for your entire life without stopping, then lomography comes along and you find out that this isn’t just a building, it’s a local treasure.

written by elisss

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