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The Cheremosh River

It´s hard to find another river on the territory of the former USSR that would be so popular and well-loved among tourists in spite of also being quite small. The Cheremosh River is a natural wonder that also makes for an interesting subject for taking pictures on a sunny day.

The Cheremosh River is a river in the Western Ukraine tributary of the Prut river and flows along the borderline of the historic regions of Bukovina and Galicia. During the middle ages and the early modern era, the Cheremosh River was part of the borderline between the Principality of Moldavia and Kingdom of Poland. Currently, it runs along the borderline between the Ivano-Frankivsk and Chernivtsi Oblasts.
Both banks in the upper part of the river are inhabited by Hutsuls.

The two upper streams of this river are called Bilyi Cheremosh (White Cheremosh) and Chornyi Cheremosh (Black Cheremosh). The river starts in the Carpathian Mountains and flows roughly SW to NE. It leaves the Bukovina Obchinas (a mountain range in Outer Eastern Carpathians stretching in Ukraine and Romania) on the river’s right, and the historic subregion of Pokuttya on the river’s left side.

So what exactly makes the Cheremosh River so attractive? The diversity of the waterway and the various “natural obstacles” that it has – it is full of sudden turns, rapids, rocks, floodgates and whirlpools make it both complex and a natural wonder. The Cheremosh River has two faces: mountainous and flat. Usually it gets troublesome after a storm but when it’s peaceful and quiet, it actually makes for an ideal place to relax in. For tourists who are planning to pay this place a visit, the Cheremosh River is actually quite near some localities, making it easy for you to have a place to stay in for the night, just check out the different tourist camps.

written by bongofury

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Português.