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The Old City Of Jerusalem

Archeological research never ends in Jerusalem, you can see big tents everywhere protecting the searchers working. The city is so full of details and things to see than just 1 lomo location is not enough. I will make more specific location next time. Kotel Wailing Wall Streets Gates people churches.

Jerusalem is obviously the most important city ever for: Jewish people (Wailing Wall), Christians people (Church of the Holy Sepulcher) and Muslims people (Al-Aksa mosque). Many centuries of history make this place special and full of mystic energy, I definite anyone to say the contrary after having spend a day there. Just walking through the narrow streets and alleys, you’ll feel immersed in history. The Old City is divided into four neighborhoods, which are named according to the ethnic affiliation of most of the people who live in them.

The Old City covers roughly 220 acres in only one square kilometer. The surrounding walls date to the rule of the Ottoman Sultan, Suleiman the Magnificent (1520-1566). Work began on them in 1537 and was not completed until 1541. The Old City has a total of 11 gates, but only seven are open. You can see the impact of the bullet on the wall of these Gates because of the battle people are still having these days. The old city is full of holly places, one of the most famous is the Kotel ha-Ma’aravi.

When Rome destroyed the Second Temple in 70 C.E., only one outer wall remained standing. The Romans probably would have destroyed that wall also, but it must have seemed too insignificant to them; it was not even part of the Temple itself, just an outer wall surrounding the Temple Mount. For the Jews, however, this remnant of what was the most sacred building in the Jewish world quickly became the holiest spot in Jewish life. Throughout the centuries, Jews from throughout the world traveled to Palestine, and immediately headed for the Kotel ha-Ma’aravi (the Western Wall) to thank God. The prayers offered at the Kotel were so heartfelt that non-Jews began calling the site the “Wailing Wall.” Go right up to the Wall and feel the texture of the stones and take in the awesome size of the structure. The largest stone in the wall is 45 feet long, 15 feet deep, 15 feet high, and weighs more than one million pounds. The Wall is 65 feet (20 meters) high.

A large plaza offers access to the Wall. You may take pictures except on Shabbat from outside the fenced enclosure near the Wall. The area is open 24-hours and is especially nice to visit when it is quiet late at night or during holidays and bar-mitzvahs when the area is filled with worshipers.

written by dudizm

3 comments

  1. vicuna

    vicuna

    Merci pour cette belle et instructive location!!

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  2. azurblue

    azurblue

    Ca donne envie d'y aller ! Belles photos à l'horizon !

    about 5 years ago · report as spam
  3. stouf

    stouf

    Un texte instructif et une galerie magnifique ! Great post !

    about 5 years ago · report as spam

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