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Making Memories: How I Almost Gave up On Film and How My Zenit 122k Convinced Me Not To

I was on the verge of losing faith in myself when it comes to film: a roll of slide film consisting of shots from a perfect trip with sunsets and beaches got torn inside a camera. My disappointment clouded my ability and drive to create lomographs and such. But then I saw the light - I mean film - and it called out to me.

I wanted to give up on film after losing what would’ve been the best roll I’ve ever shot: a Lomography slide film with photos from my Puerto Princesa, Palawan trip.

Due to my stupidity and carelessness, I accidentally ripped that roll with my Zenit 122K.

My drive in using film was almost lost… until I got back the rolls that I shot during my Hong Kong-Macau trip. To tell you that I was surprised isn’t enough. I was beyond happy. After seeing my black and white photos and some of my La Sardina shots, I was encouraged.

I used these cameras with more knowledge after my mishap.

I started using the La Sardina’s flash more often, giving me excitement whenever I get the rolls back and see that my friends’ pictures look cool.

And I used my Zenit more often. I love using it on special occasions, like my dad’s birthday. We ate at different restaurants during his birthday week and I love some of the portrait shots I have of him and my mom.

One of the best moments I have is developing my own film. Some of the photos were not that special, but developing the film itself gave me such a high that it’s still marked as one of my best film moments. Even when I scanned the roll, the images I had were just your average everyday photos. I didn’t care at all. I just wanted to develop more black and white rolls after that.

Needless to say, every film moment is a memorable one. It may not always be a special occasion or planned travel trips, but even your normal days can be memorable with film. Sometimes, it’s not the moment but the shot or the film that makes it memorable, the effort behind taking the photo and having it developed, and seeing such normal things in a different light or in a special way that makes it extraordinary. You’ll know you’re in too deep when you leave the digital grind behind and stock your freezer with all sorts of films.

written by patsnaps

2 comments

  1. mnella

    mnella

    All photographers have at least once story about how they accidentally opened their camera before rewinding the film. It's invariably the best shot that was destroyed . It may even be the photographer's equivalent of "The One That Got Away" :-)

    10 months ago · report as spam
  2. patsnaps

    patsnaps

    @mnella indeed. it's actually heartbreaking. but then we lomo on...

    10 months ago · report as spam