Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

Combat Zone in Afghanistan: Tintype Portraits by Ed Drews

The love of photography never really leaves anyone. For staff sergeant Ed Drew, he brought his photography artistry during his deployment in the war zone in Afghanistan.

The Brooklyn-born photographer Ed Drew brought his love for photography to the sandy and sun-lit soil of Afghanistan. His tintype photographs document the lives of the men and women serving the United States Air Force Combat Rescue Unit in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

His carefully created and meticulously produced tintype photos show the life of the servicemen during their time of deployment. The other photographs share a candid look at the otherwise serious location but what stands out is the fact that Ed Drew’s tintypes are the first of their kind in a battlefield since the technique was used during the Civil War. Drew knew that he was going to need a few things to keep him busy while on tour that’s why he kept his photography sharp. With this case, he moved way past sharp, Drew wrote an ode to this classic photographic art.

Tintype photography offers a rich historical feel to the lives of the people that Drew served with. Their portraits are a shout out to the old school Civil War tintype photographs that now fittingly belong to museums and galleries. Ed Drew’s challenge came from the process of producing the prints themselves. Tintype photography has a rich and old-looking beauty to it and is as difficult to complete, more so with the harsh environment of Afghanistan.

All information and photos used in this article were sourced from Ed Drew’s site, The New Yorker and Film’s Not Dead.

Related posts:
Civil War Tin Type Photography
Museum asks, ‘Do you know who are in these tintype photos?’
How Tintype Photographs Are Made
Photographer Makes Tintypes Out of Old, Rusty Cans

written by cheeo

No comments yet, be the first