Petzval_header_october_2014
Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

These blind photographers are still taking photos -- How about you?

We all have moments of being stuck in a rut, but once you learn about the struggles and triumphs of blind photographers -- yes, you're reading it right -- I bet you will find no excuse to keep taking pictures for as long as your eyes will let you. Read about the inspiring stories of Sonia Soberats, Gary Albertson, and Pete Eckert after the jump.

Whenever you feel uninspired, bored, or not in the mood to pick up your camera and shoot, you only have to recall three names to help you get un-stuck from that rut: Sonia Soberats, Gary Albertson, and Pete Eckert.

What these photographers have in common may amaze, fascinate, and even shock you: they are all blind.

Sonia Soberats from New York City lost her vision in 1991 but took photography classes ten years later. To take photos, she makes her subjects pose in total darkness then utilizes the light painting technique to illuminate them. Her assistants keep the shutter of her camera open as she works, the exposures ranging from two minutes to an hour.

Sonia tells her story in the short film entitled “Seeing Again” by Pablo Mediavilla Costa below:

If you want to watch another video, Reverie Inc. also has a nice one here.

Livingston Land, one of Gary Albertson’s photos that were showcased for the Casey Eye Institute Exhibit. Photo via Gary Albertson’s Website

Oregon-based fine landscape photographer Gary Albertson developed a rare form of glaucoma in 2010, which reduced his sight in both eyes to thin circles of peripheral vision. However, he makes most of this very limited vision and continues to brave the banks of Central Oregon’s Metolious River with a large format camera and tripod in tow.

Katherine Cook of KGW Portland tells the story of Gary and shows him at work with the report below:

Photos by Pete Eckert via Visual Impairment Blog

Last but not the least is Sacramento-based photographer Pete Eckert, who learned about his deteriorating eyesight due to retinitis pigmentosa 27 years ago. Trained as a sculptor and on his way to being an architect back then, Pete said he was a visual person for half his life. Even if it took him two years of emotional struggle brought by the traumatic episode of his life, but he eventually told himself, “I will not be beaten.”

Similar to Sonia’s technique, Pete “dances on the edge of perception” and makes surreal lightpaintings on film using a Mamiya camera.

Watch a poignant documentary short by The Avant/Garde Diaries below to learn more about Pete Eckert and how he works:

Do you find these photographers and their works/stories inspiring? Share your insights with us with a comment below!

All information for this article were sourced from PetaPixel.

written by plasticpopsicle

3 comments

  1. mafiosa

    mafiosa

    Awesome <3

    about 1 year ago · report as spam
  2. dieuwkemonica

    dieuwkemonica

    Awesome and very inspiring article!
    about 1 year ago · report as spam
  3. superlighter

    superlighter

    I'm really impressed by this article, and what a wonderful pictures they made!

    about 1 year ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Deutsch, Русский, Spanish, Italiano, Nederlands & Français.