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Lumiere Tintype Photobooth: The Mobile Tintype Portrait Studio

In today's digital age, it's quite hard to imagine still having an analogue photo studio. Lumiere Tintype Photobooth however, is an exception as its a mobile photo studio that caters exclusively to tintypes using traditional 19th century methods!

Photo from Lumiere Tintype

People keep on harping about the death of film and alternative photographic purposes, but they clearly haven’t been paying attention. It is very much alive with the passion of analogue enthusiasts, as evidenced by husband and wife photography team Loren Doyen and Adrian Whipp’s Lumiere Tintype Photobooth is any indication.

Photo from Lumiere Tintype

Tintypes and mobile tintype studios were the norm a hundred or so years ago. Once you shot a frame, you need to process it as soon as possible, hence the need for a mobile lab. This process of course, gradually lost to the test of time. Not to worry though, as the interest in tintypes and other wet plate processes have seen a resurgence over the past couple of years. To inspire you guys further, here’s what they have to say about their tintypes:

At Lumiere, we create tintypes using traditional 19th century methods. This is not our beloved modern photography, with its endless stream of disposable photographs. Instead, at the intersection of science and art, we find an alchemy that requires us to slow down and return to the very roots of photography. We set the chemistry in motion and release the light through glass with the rigor of a scientist, and yet we must surrender our images to chance and to accident.

The images are always elegant and yet never perfect. They charm and surprise us with their chemical swirls, streaks, comets and scratches; forever suspended within the collodion.

Information and photos from this article was sourced from Lumiere Tintype Photobooth

written by cruzron

1 comment

  1. bkspicture

    bkspicture

    Awesome article!!

    11 months ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Italiano.