Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

Throwback Thursday: The First Photobooth

Ever been curious about what the very first photobooth looked like, and what kind of photos it took? I have the answer for you in this Throwback Thursday installment!

The world’s first commercially successful photobooth was invented by Conrad Bernitt of Hamburg, and patented on July 16, 1890. It was called Bosco Automat, after the 19th century magician Giovanni Bartolomeo Bosco. It took a single tintype photo over a black painted metal base with raised edges (which was also conveniently decorated to resemble a frame), serving as a developing dish of some sort to catch the developer and fixer chemicals. The whole process took three minutes, but the surface of the tintype cannot be touched yet and should be allowed to dry. The tintype had an ornate gold design at the back, and came with with a case for storage and a card of the Bosco Automat photobooth.

Watch a video showcasing a beautiful Bosco Automat tintype below:

All information and photos for this article were sourced from Bosco Automat on Wikipedia

written by plasticpopsicle

No comments yet, be the first

Read this article in another language

This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Italiano.