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My First Film Swap with a Diana F+ and a Splitzer

My first film swap was a learning experiment. I swapped two rolls of medium format film with a fellow lomographer in Spain. We both used Diana F+ cameras and a Splitzer, and although the results left much to be desired, I can't wait to do my next film swap!

I recently received the results of my first film swap. From Springfield, Missouri, USA to Barcelona, Spain. Elisabet and I used our Diana F+ cameras and a Splitzer to expose two rolls of Lomography ISO 400 Color Negative Film.

The results were not what we expected, but I certainly don’t regret our film swap experiment. I remember my excitement when I first told my father that I was doing a film swap, and my disappointment when he reminded me that I could achieve double exposure effects digitally. Clearly photoshop defeats the purpose of analogue photography!

Our film swap project began late last summer, when I exposed the top portion of both of the film rolls by using a Diana Splitzer to cover the bottom half of the lens. When Elisabet received the film, she used the Splitzer to cover the top portion of the lens, exposing the bottom half. Unfortunately, only a handful out of the 32 exposures came out, and I regret that Elisabet had to pay to get the defective film developed.

Perhaps the error occurred when I mailed the film from America to Europe. I wanted to send it via FedEx, which would have been a safer choice, but it would have cost over $150 to send two rolls of medium format film overseas. Instead, I opted to send the film through the United States Postal Service. I placed the film in a black, light-tight bag within a thick, padded envelope, which I covered in warning labels stating that the package contained undeveloped photographic film. Nevertheless, I imagine the film went through an X-Ray machine somewhere in transit through customs, rendering the unexposed portion of the film useless by the time it reached Elisabet. Also, I doubt that the light-tight bag protected film from radiation. Or maybe the film defect happened because the film sat for a while between the time that I exposed it and Elisabet exposed it. It’s also possible that the Splitzer was defective. Whatever the reason, it has not discouraged me from film swaps. Elisabet and I are going to try it again soon!

Any tips or feedback would be greatly appreciated. Lomo on!

1 comment

  1. sarah-addison-dobard

    sarah-addison-dobard

    @crevans27 and @vicker313 thanks for liking my article! And Collette, I have some film to send you way once I get it all together! xx

    over 1 year ago · report as spam