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Analogue Day Activity: Stop and Listen to a Street Musician

A day without music is like a day without color. And while modern technology has made it possible for us to listen to songs in just a click of a button, when was the last time you’ve actually heard music play first-hand?

Like all things analogue, there’s always that special element when you can tangibly experience a work of art. In the case of music, hearing the melody and the notes personally adds more emotion. It captures the heart and affects. It can move a person to tears, as quick as it can brighten another’s.

But alas, in this modern world, everything’s become a rush. Man’s life has become so fast-paced, that everything else has become a blur. To borrow from the old adage, almost no one stops to smell the roses anymore.

You may remember this viral video released by The Washington Post in August of 2007. The video showed Joshua Bell, a well-known violin virtuoso, participating on a social experiment. Dressed nondescript clothes, he positioned himself in a location that had a lot of traffic and proceeded to play.

“No one knew it, but the fiddler standing against a bare wall outside the Metro […] was one of the finest classical musicians in the world, playing some of the most elegant music ever written on one of the most valuable violins ever made. His performance was arranged by The Washington Post as an experiment in context, perception and priorities — as well as an unblinking assessment of public taste: In a banal setting at an inconvenient time, would beauty transcend?” – The Washington Post

You can read the Pulitzer Prize-winning feature article on this social experiment here.

So, what does this teach us? Beauty is everywhere, but you’d never really experience it if you don’t stop and take notice. So, do yourself a favour and stop, listen and appreciate. You’d be glad you did.

How do you make your life a little bit more analogue with each day’s passing? Aside from these Analogue Day Activities we’ve been sharing, why don’t you inspire your fellow lomographers as we inch closer to the worldwide Film Photography Day celebrations and share with us your own stories? Remember, you can also schedule your own meet-ups for the big event, show your analogue life through an awesome video, and profess your love for all things analogue with some of your best snaps!

written by geegraphy

1 comment

  1. diomaxwelle

    diomaxwelle

    Oh my god, I read that article and I wept openly. I regret not living in a city where street musicians play often (when they do, I always stop because its so rare). Its such a pity that music is one of the most beautiful things to me that I can never take a picture of; only a reminder it was simply played, if I photograph the musician.

    over 1 year ago · report as spam