Black_friday_en
Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

Long Exposures with Colorful Blurs by Brice Bischoff

A Los Angeles-based photographer came up with a simple yet clever way to add color to his long exposure photographs using large sheets of brightly colored paper. We bet you've never tried something like this before with your long exposure photos, so take a look at the results after the jump!

When we talk of long exposures, it’s typically done to capture interesting cityscapes at dusk, resulting in beautiful photos of metropolises glowing in city lights. Or, done in dark or dim lighting for lightpainting, a technique many of us lomographers are familiar with and fond of. But, a photographer based in Los Angeles takes his long exposures in a way most of us probably haven’t thought of: by using large sheets of colored paper to create colorful, abstract blurs that serve as the centerpiece of his photographs.

For his project called Bronson Caves, Brice Bischoff visited the man-made caves (built as stage sets for movies and television shows) between 2009 and 2010 in Griffith Park in Los Angeles, and took his 4 × 5 large format camera to take long exposures there. Probably nothing special there, but then, he also took with him some large sheets of brightly colored paper, which he waved around as the exposure went on.

Bischoff describes his creative process in his blog :

“I performed actions for the camera with massive sheets of colored paper. Since a long-exposure photograph was produced rather than a motion picture, the papers were recorded as voluminous, glowing colors. The materiality of the rainbowed forms, emerging from the mouth of the cave, dancing about the canyon, and bubbling up from the ground, are based solely in the photographic process, and can only be experienced when viewing the final photographic prints.”

The results are interesting. Set amidst the dull color and texture of the caves, the large paper sheets are reduced to colorful blurs, with only a hint of the artist’s performance discernible.

PetaPixel even observed that it’s somewhat similar to doing light paintings, only using colored paper and shooting at daytime instead of using colored pen lights and shooting at night. We think that’s a pretty good and accurate way of looking at Bischoff’s technique!

We certainly had a why-didn’t-I-think-of-that moment seeing Brice Bischoff’s work, but what do you think of his photos and long exposure technique? Share your thoughts with us with a comment below!

All information and photos for this article were sourced from PetaPixel and Brice Bischoff’s Blog.

written by plasticpopsicle

3 comments

  1. blueskyandhardrock

    blueskyandhardrock

    love the bronson caves! nice technique! thanks for sharing!

    almost 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. boredslacker

    boredslacker

    Never thought of doing something like light painting in the day! Looks great!

    almost 2 years ago · report as spam
  3. quigs

    quigs

    Impressive!

    over 1 year ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: 中文(繁體版).