This is your last chance to pre-order your Petzval Lens and get the special aperture plates included for free! With estimated delivery in August (or even sooner), don’t miss out on securing your picture perfect portrait lens!

Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

Ask Your Guru: Djramsay Asks Ululchen

We took a quick rest but we're back again for the most burning Lomography questions! Wanna know more about analogue? Then head on and read this week's edition of Ask Your Guru!

We have done several interviews for our Ask Your Guru feature and hey, maybe it’s safe to say that they just keep on getting better. And for our first interview this December, we bring you Newcomer djramsay and LomoGuru ululchen.

Photo by ululchen

She has been a member of the Community for quite a long time already — sharing memories and experiences through sweet Lomographs found in her LomoHome. Her first Lomographic camera was a Fisheye which remains with her until now. You probably know our Lomoguru ululchen or Luzia Lötscher from Switzerland.

Luzia just recently finished her master’s degree in Material Science and Engineering. A Lomographic wiz if you ask me!

Photo by djramsay

And for our not-so-new Newcomer who has been doing the Lomo-rounds for more than a year already, we bring you djramsay or Daniel Ramsay outside the Community.

Daniel currently resides in the UK and aside from Lomography also loves cooking. He is married to fellow Lomographer, carrie27.

Djramsay’s most popular Lomograph!

Now that we’re A-okay with the introducing, let’s see how their Q&A went!

Daniel Ramsay (DR): With limited slide film available what would you recommend I stock my freezer with?

Luzia Lötscher (LL): My personal favourites are cross-processed Fuji slide films. If you can still get your hands on some Sensia 100 or 200, go for it! The same goes for T64. Of the ones that are still in production. Provia 100F is my favourite. By the way, this is what they put in the new Agfa CT Precisa, which is usually cheaper.

DR: Any tips on doubles?

LL: When taking doubles I always ask myself: “Would this shot be worthy of a single shot?” If so, chances are high that I will also like the result of the double exposure.

DR: What do you think about this photo? Any ideas how it got to happen?

LL: Looks like a lucky coincidence of the right film with the right light and perfect timing!

A lucky yet perfect confidence!

DR: I’m thinking of creating a darkroom but haven’t used one for 28 years so I have no idea where to start. Can you recommend anything on processing your own film with a darkroom?

LL: I usually process all my film by myself, but to be honest, I don’t have a proper darkroom. I have never done prints either, so I can’t give you tips about that. Just to develop the films, though, the only part you really need to do in the dark is to put the film into the developing tank. Before doing that I usually sit in the “darkroom” for about five minutes in order to adjust my eyes to the darkness and to check if the room is really light-proof. If you can discern your surroundings after that time, it isn’t. I buy all my chemicals online and they usually come with instructions, so that’s pretty straightforward. Also, I don’t have a developing machine, but I turn the developing tank manually in a water quench which is adjusted to the right temperature (approximately.) Developing is really not that complicated, so just give it a try, make mistakes and learn from them!

DR: I haven’t had much luck with red scale… Any advice when it comes to ISO settings? What are the effects when the ISO is up or down?

LL: Using the classic Lomo Redscale 100 film is pretty straightforward, I think, and I have never been disappointed with the results. When using the Lomo XR 50-200, I personally prefer lower ISO settings, as they yield greener tones which is something you wouldn’t get with the classic redscale film. When redscaling my own colour negative film, I go at least two stops down, i.e. when redscaling an ISO 400 film, I would shoot it at ISO 100 or lower. In that case, ISO 100 would yield the classic orange tones, while lower ISO values like 50 or 25 would yield greener tones, as is the case for the Lomo XR film.

That was a quick but interesting one! Our Ask Your Guru is better than Google, actually (especially with that Redscale tip!) Thank you, Daniel and Luzia! Until the next edition of Ask Your Guru~

Are you a curious Newcomer? Or maybe a LomoGuru who would like to share tips and tricks to our noobs? Then this is your time to be featured! Just drop me a line at mayee.gonzales@lomography.com. Catch ya!

written by mayeemayee

4 comments

  1. mayeemayee

    mayeemayee

    Thank you for this @ululchen and @djramsay! :)

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  2. mayeemayee

    mayeemayee

    Awesome Q&A, btw!

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  3. djramsay

    djramsay

    @mayeemayee @ululchen thank you :)

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  4. ululchen

    ululchen

    thanks guys! @mayeemayee @djramsay

    over 1 year ago · report as spam