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Life-Sized Photograph Sculptures By Gwon Osang

Printed photographs can be cut, folded, and pasted to create and jazz up many things, but have you ever tried making sculptures out of yours--life-sized ones, in fact? There's a Korean artist who has been doing it, so maybe we can all draw inspiration from his work!

With the staggering amount of beautiful lomo-portraits uploaded on our site daily, there’s no doubt that we lomographers like taking portraits. We also have many tipsters making use of printed lomographs not only for making scrapbooks and LomoWalls, but also for jazzing up work spaces, storage stuff, personal items. But, has anyone out there thought of making sculptures out of their prints?

Well, Korean artist Gwon Osang has, and he’s been doing amazing works of art out of photos—hundreds and hundreds of printed photographs. Not just simple sculptures, but his subjects rendered in life-sized likenesses. Take a look at some of them:

How does he do it? Take in Gwon Osang’s creative process, in his own words:

“I began with photographs to make lightweight sculpture. I first made a chisel for wood and then stone. Following that I finished a work titled An Obsessive Report on Power (p. ), which consisted of an arm to symbolize material and the power to control it. I had created these because they were elements that I felt I lacked. Though I linked sculpture to photography, I think I was more interested in photography at the time.

In fact, it was people in photography who first responded to my work and at the time photography was more influential. I took full advantage of photography’s merits, not least of which was the ease of changing the object’s size. And I was fascinated by the commonality between film negatives and the plaster mold. This has helped me make the human body in all its different and often distorted forms."

If you want to learn more about his work and creative process, check out this nice FlavorWire interview or watch this Daily Motion Art Talk feature.

What do you think of Gwon Osang’s work? Do you think you can try your hand at making photo sculptures? Share your thoughts with us with a comment below!

All information for this article were sourced from Dangerous Minds and Lost At E Minor.

written by plasticpopsicle

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