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Rosy Redscales with XR and X Tungsten

The classic XR Redscale film offers some hugely stunning results, because of the eXtended Range, but some of you might not know about what kind of cool results you can get with the X Tungsten 64 film, if you shoot on a very bright day!

Photo by yopanic

Once upon a time, in Lomography, there was the classic Redscale film, which wasn’t XR as the present one: now you can set a different ISO in your camera to get a very large range (and different kinds of colors) in your pictures, due to the eXtended Range capability of this amazing film.

The amazing discovery was made when I started experimenting with the X Tungsten 64 film because I realized that the overexposed frames turned out pink and redscaled when I scanned them with the Epson Perfection V500 Photo scanner. Blues and cold tones (which usually belong to the X Tungsten film) disappear, and they are replaced by these pink and red tones, with some green tones added.

As you can see in my pictures, sometimes they look like Fuji Velvia shots. That’s a strange result but it doesn’t depend on your scanner configuration.

Try to overexpose (a little, not too much) the X Tungsten film, and try to get the same result if you like it. I think it’s the right film to have a strange and different kind of Redscale pictures, not the same ones, which you are used to seeing here in Lomography. This is the perfect film for people who love redscale and at the same time, those who want to experiment with a new kind of challenge like this.

written by yopanic

3 comments

  1. weaver

    weaver

    you captured beautiful tones! i noticed the redness too, when i used the film on a beach on a sunny day: http://www.lomograph(…)3-sun-times

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  2. yopanic

    yopanic

    @weaver It depends on the camera (because I used the LC-Wide, at 200 iso) and on the scanning... Maybe I can write some guidelines for Tungsten scanning, but I only know the Epson Perfection V500 Photo settings.

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  3. harpoonflyby

    just to be clear, are you un-rolling and re-rolling the film in reverse as one would for redscale?
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