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Weaving the Streets

Some people see graffiti as an unwelcome element on the neighbourhood street; but for Laura Ortiz Vega, that isn’t the case. She spends her time scouting for the most vibrant street art in Mexico City and turns them into bright woven masterpieces.

When we hear the word graffiti, perhaps the word juvenile comes into mind. We think of hooded young’uns roaming the streets at night, carrying bottles of spray paint, and on the prowl for next space where they can show and express their radical stands.

But Laura Ortiz Vega manages to steer us from this train of thought with her reworking and “re-contextualzing” of the images. She uses a traditional artisan technique of yarn painting to capture the scene and provide us with a visual display of vibrancy and color.

The technique, which originated from the Huichol people — an ethnic group situated in western central Mexico, involves the tight weaving and stringing and pressing of colorful wood threads in a surface coated with a natural glue, a special beeswax called cera de Campeche.

And while the original image is massive, overwhelming in proportion, and has a masculine feel to it, Vega’s scaled down versions give off a softer vibe, forming a nice juxtaposition of the modern and youthful medium, and the old and traditional.

Cool, isn’t it? What do you guys think? Has this given you a glimpse of a new-found (or perhaps even a stronger) appreciation for street art? Share your thoughts below!

All information from this article were taken from Flavorwire, Ohbeahbar, the Arts Observer, and the Lyons Wier Gallery.

written by geegraphy

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