Petzval_header_october_2014_en
Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

Cinema Paradiso: A Venetian Short Film Experience with LomoKino!

Read on about my first time trying analogue movie making in Venice, home of the oldest international film festival in the world!

Last year, I managed to purchase a cheap return air ticket to Venice, Italy during my upcoming Christmas holidays in December. It would be the first time I travel solo with my film cameras so naturally I was looking forward to the trip. Anyway, my flatmate had just bought the then newly-released LomoKino and he kindly offered me to take it along.

I chose to bring along two rolls of Kodak UltraMax 400 to be used on the LomoKino, having read about the potential gloomy weather during winter; not to mention the shorter daytime too. As I was using my LC-Wide, LC-A+, and Sprocket Rocket as well during the trip, I did not have the LomoKino ready to shoot all the time, only taking it out of my sling bag when I feel that something interesting could be recorded.

As I have not tried my hands on movie making this way before, I did a few researches on other users’ results using the LomoKino. I learnt that sometimes, in a bid to save on number of shots since this camera gulps film very quickly, some would only record a scene in 3-4 shots. It resulted in a particular scene ending up like a slideshow of pictures. Hence, when I was using it in Venice, I tried to use up at least 8-9 shots per scene, hoping that it would provide a better scene recording.

Using the LomoKino was a great experience — just the act of turning the crank itself was enough to catch a few people’s attention! I did not have a particular storyline that time; since it was still only my first experience with it, I decided to randomly shoot anything interesting and hoped that all turned out well! I did not bother looking through the viewfinder because it limits my field of vision and really limits the camera’s potential — I just point it at my subject and hoped the camera would do its job!

I sent my film to be developed and scanned, so when I got the files they were all in 4 shots per image like a SuperSampler. I guessed the lab had not seen anything like that and they cut off some of the shots; had I discovered that my university has scanning facilities at the Photography department I would have done it myself that time! Nevertheless, I took a look at the photos and I thought I could work with most of it. Thankfully, all images turned out good enough; some were better than expected, such as the seafood market and a scene on the last day when the sun was finally showing!

I did all the cropping in Photoshop and used Windows Movie Maker to compile them, using the tutorial at LomoKino’s microsite. I managed to use all the shots and did no rearranging of any sorts as well in this video, hence what you see happened chronologically during my trip. I also added a track — Antonio Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons: Winter | Concerto No. 4, Op. 8 RV 293, Largo. There was really no one better than Vivaldi’s music since he was born in Venice and this is the winter part of his Four Seasons!

This is a great camera; although some work is required before reaching the end product, the results are really satisfying. I have yet to purchase a LomoKino for myself, but I think it would be a great target to save up for some piggies!

Enter a new analogue dimension with the LomoKino. Lomography’s own 35mm analogue movie camera allows you to capture action and immortalize your story on film! Shoot 144 frames on any 35mm film and create your own cinematic masterpieces. Want to watch your movie the old-school way? We also offer the LomoKino and LomoKinoscope package!

written by shuttersentinel17

No comments yet, be the first