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Old Film, New Surprises

I love old films. The mystery around it, when you find one and you try to guess who used it, what was shot with it and when...Recently I've found some, let me show you what were the images on it...

The nice thing about old films is that they pop up from everywhere. Behind the library, in a old metal box or the inside drawer of an old desk that you wouldn’t open because you knew only old stuff was there…Majority of the time, you are not even looking for it…you seek an old notebook, a book, an old dress, a photograph or even an old family jewel and you find one. You start trying to figure out if it was used or not, what was shot with it, when was it used and by whom…You can’t really say, but before rushing to the lab, you let yourself dream a little because that’s the magic of old films, they keep mysteries from us, and before revealing those mysteries, you let yourself live them for a while…

A few months ago, I found two old films and two disposable cameras in my mother’s library. I ended up forgetting about them again but last week, I finally took both films to be developed. As much as I tried, I couldn’t really tell when they were used and by whom, my mother wasn’t of much help either…The first one had photos of my birthday from 7 or 8 years ago, I can’t really say. It was surprising to see all that but I was more surprised with the second one. It was much older and I appeared to be much younger in these photographs. Time had also done the most amazing effects in some of the photographs, let me show you:

These are my favorite ones:

The first one is the beautiful window of a convent in Portugal called Convento de Cristo. The second: my mother, my aunt, and I. I love how my mother is disappearing from the photograph. The third, an old church in Santarém, Portugal with weird dots in the down left corner and a pinkish glow…

Photos I took, I guess, during a trip to school with a boat:

And photographs taken in stronghold and the Tower of Cabaças of Santarém in Portugal:

The last one I can’t really say where it was taken, but I’ll show it to you nevertheless:

I was so surprised with the first photographs I’ve shown you, by its effects done by light and time. To finish, I advise you to look, look everywhere for every single old film you can find at your house, before rushing to the lab, try to figure them out and pose yourself all these questions, then go, and be surprised with what you’ll get.

I still have two used disposable cameras, and I’ll be developing them soon, can’t wait!

Old can be fun, and old can be Lomo!

2 comments

  1. hollyelizabeth_

    hollyelizabeth_

    Your photos are great! I recently found two disposable cameras in a drawer that my Mum thinks are from the 90s. I've been meaning to get developed for weeks, I can't wait for the results!

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. brunomcp

    brunomcp

    Before diving into the hobby of lomography, my past contact with analog photography always has been the disposable cameras I took to field trips, and though I was just a child, the pictures were lovely.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam

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