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Great (Analogue) Things Come in Small Packages

Just because the digital world has been coming up with slim and compact cameras doesn't mean the analogue world doesn't have its own mini shooters. If you're wondering about some of the world's smallest film cameras, we've put together a gallery of some notable ones!

The realm of film photography is known for many of its iconic cameras, among them some of the handiest shooters in history. As the age-old adage says, big things come in small packages, so we came up with a list that features some of the smallest film cameras ever, majority of which we believe are familiar to you!

Medium Format Cameras

While medium format cameras are generally large and heavy, simple plastic cameras like the Diana, Holga, and Vredeborch Felica were introduced as more affordable options for medium format photography. These cameras are definitely some of the handiest medium format shooters, easier and less heavier to lug around than most of their counterparts.

35mm Cameras

Many popular compact shooters come in the prevalent 35mm format, so we lomographers and film camera collectors love to scour around for some of these neat cameras. The iconic LC-A and its successors are without a doubt among the world’s most compact cameras (and not just because they have “Kompakt” in their names) — ask any lomographer and he or she will surely rave about how handy it is (especially for street snaps).

Of course, if you’re after many other impressive compact 35mm cameras, you’ll never miss the Minox 35 series (the smallest full-frame cameras ever made), Rollei 35 S (the smallest 35mm non-electronic shutter camera) and Olympus OM-1 (one of the smallest 35mm SLR cameras).

Half-Frame Cameras

Talk about compact shooters and you’re sure to come across the half-frame cameras. These handy cameras were very trendy back in the 1960s, especially in Japan, where Olympus became the trend-setter for introducing its Pen models. Cameras from the Olympus EE series remain to be some of the most sought after vintage finds, along with some rare ones like the stylish Konica Recorder pictured above. Of course, the handy and trendy Diana Mini, with its half-frame mode, deserves to be included in this list!

110 Cameras

The cartridge-based 110 film format is perhaps the smallest we lomographers and film photographers can go today. 110 cameras effortlessly slip inside purses and pockets, making them popular snap-shooting companions then and now. The smallest film SLR is the Pentax Auto 110. However, as if the typical slim 110 cameras were not “pocketable” enough, miniature versions called “keychain cameras” were eventually introduced, such as the Sonett Micro 110 and Vivitar Micro 110.

Now, it’s time for one of Lomography’s biggest surprises ever: say hello to the Fisheye Baby 110 Camera, which is bound to be one of the world’s noteworthy teeny cameras! This analogue cutie works like her big brother, the Fisheye camera – same effects, same picture size, same fun – only teenie weenie! We know you want to try out this ultra cute and compact analogue companion, so grab one now and load it with some Orca 110 Black and White film goodness!

The Fisheye Baby 110 Cameras are fully working miniature versions of the Fisheye No. 2 designed especially to fit 110 film. They capture the world in full circle and enable you to produce perfect Fisheye pictures. The Fisheye Baby 110 Cameras come with a bulb mode and are able to capture multiple exposures too. Load them with Lomography Orca B&W 100 and dive into the long forgotten world of 110 photography! Head to the 110 Camera Microsite for more information.

written by plasticpopsicle

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Deutsch, 한국어, 日本語, 中文(简体版), 中文(繁體版), ภาษาไทย, Nederlands, Türkçe & Spanish.