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All About 35mm Film

We all know 35mm as the most ubiquitous film type out there, so what else do you need to know about it? Here's the lowdown on the most popular and enduring film format of all time!

35mm

  • Also known as 135
  • 35 millimeters (1.4 inches) wide
  • Each full-frame measures about 36 × 24 millimeters—the ratio adopted by full-frame digital SLR cameras today
  • Introduced by Kodak in 1934
  • The most popular film format, surpassing 120 in the ’60s
Photo via lomography

Cassette

  • The single-spool metal case film comes in
  • Light-tight to allow loading in daylight and prevents light leaks
  • Marked with a DX encoding pattern (barcode) which certain cameras can read and use to optimize settings
Photo via wikipedia

Film

  • Types: color negative, color positive (color reversal/slide), black & white, infrared, redscale, tungsten
  • Speeds: typically ranges from 100 – 800 ISO; could be as low as 25 – 64 ISO for tungsten or as high as 1600 – 3200 ISO for low-light shooting
  • Exposures: commonly 12, 24 or 36 frames; odd frame counts like 27 are not rare
  • Formats: half-frame (18 × 24), square (24 × 24), panoramic (24 × 58)
Photo via wikipedia

More info

  • Developed and produced at an experimental scale in Thomas A. Edison’s laboratory in New Jersey by splitting 70mm roll film (for cinema) around 1889
  • Comes in Kodak Standard perforations
  • Made of plastic (polyester, PET, nitrocellulose or cellulose acetate), coated with an emulsion containing light-sensitive silver halide salts, bonded by gelatin, with variable crystal sizes that determine the sensitivity, contrast and resolution quality
  • Cameras that use 35mm: Lomo LC-A+, Diana Mini, Fisheye, La Sardina, panoramic cameras, and even the LomoKino movie camera!

Sources include Lomography, Kodak, Camerapedia, and Wikipedia.

Who says film is dead? Lomography’s got its very own 35mm emulsions to keep the fire burning! Visit the Shop and see which Lomography film is right for you.

written by denisesanjose

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