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Photographing Time: Michael Wesely

A few weeks ago, I stumbled upon Michael Chrisman's year-long exposure of the Toronto Skyline and thought to myself, "Wow, a whole year?" Well, just imagine, there's another man who did it for 3 years! Read about it after the jump!

Michael Wesely is the name of the man who decided to capture time. His vision of the world includes anything (or everything) changing and he set himself a goal — to capture that change.

However, he did not do so using blending techniques using Photoshop and had a picture taken everyday for a duration of 2-3 years. He actually took single, 2-3 year-long exposures of whatever change he was trying to capture!

At first look, you won’t see anything that points to a 3-year exposure. But if you look a little closer, you start noticing things. You notice the construction cranes slowly disappearing (or emerging), you notice buildings taking shape, you see the light streaks in the sky and recognize the sun movement in them. This is pretty amazing in my opinion.

Sadly, Michael Wesely has not yet shared his secret, the details of how he took these pictures. Obviously, it must be a pinhole-like camera. But I don’t think that’s nearly enough information for us to try an experiment like that ourselves, without being extremely disappointed of having “wasted” 3 years of our lives waiting for a picture that was overexposed to the point of destruction after 3 months, just because we didn’t use the proper film or photographic paper.

Whoever is interested in this artist should take a look at his book entitled Open Shutter which, among other things, discusses the above pictures in detail and provides zoomed-in fractions of them to portray the change in a more apparent way.

All information used for this article were taken from Photo Slaves, Museum of Modern Art, and Weseley.org.

written by xxxanderrr

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