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Living Pictures by Mole and Thomas

In the early 20th century, English photographer Arthur Mole and his American associate John Thomas were commissioned to take photos of soldiers while they assembled to form various symbols in the history of America. Learn more after the break.

Photos via Telegraph UK

The government commissioned Arthur Mole and John Thomas to take the photos of troops in order to boost their spirits. It was just after the First World War and the government thought that it would be great for the soldiers who risked their lives to be part of history once more. The photographs were also sold to the public in order for the government to have finances for military operations.

Mole and Thomas traveled to different camp sites across the United States to take these amazing photos. The two men worked for several days in order to get the formations right. Mole had to look through the lens of his camera and draw an outline to serve as a guide for the symbol that was to be captured. Soldiers were then asked to plant down flags on several points with the guidance of Mole. Although it took days to complete the symbol formations, it only took a few minutes for the soldiers to get into position and prepare for the shot. Mole and Thomas positioned themselves atop an 80-foot tower to get all the soldiers within the frame.

Each symbol was made up of thousands of soldiers. The photo of the Statue of Liberty above was made up of 18,000 soldiers – 12,000 of them positioned to be the torch. Below are more photos from Mole and Thomas’ collection.

The photos taken by Mole and Thomas are now considered part of the Library of Congress and the Museum of Modern Art.

The source used for this article was Telegraph UK.

written by jeanmendoza

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