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Stereoviews of Meiji Period

Stereoscopy is an imaging technique that creates the illusion of depth that comes across as three-dimensional. In the late 19th century, Japanese photographer T. Enami shot some 3D stereoviews of Japan during the Meiji Period.


Stereoscopy images consists of two 2-dimensional photos that are combined in order to trick the viewer into thinking that the image is 3-dimensional. The 2 images that are combined seem to be identical, only having a few details that are different from each other. In the late 19th century T. Enami, a Japanese photographer, was able to capture photographs of sumo wrestlers, geishas, and travellers during the Meiji era. Back in the day, these stereoscopic images were viewed with a stereo viewer. He is known as one of the best photographers when it comes to small-format images, such as the stereoview. Today, the illusion brought by stereoscopy image can easily be viewed through gifs (Graphics Interchange Format).

Okinawa Soba created some gif images of the stereoscopy images taken by T. Enami. The vibrant colors on the photos were meticulously hand-tinted for hours using fine brushes, some of which with only a single hair. Take note that the stereoviews were only a few inches, and tinting them had to be done under a microscope.

View more of the gifs done by Okinawa Soba below. You can also check out his Flickr account to get more information on stereoviews and see more photos.







Information for this article was taken from Pink Tentacle, Wikipedia – T. Enami and Wikipedia – Stereoscopy. All gif images via Pink Tentacle Pink Tentacle.

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written by jeanmendoza

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