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Fatescapes: Influential Photographs Altered and Rendered

Ordinary settings become notable and striking backdrops to viral photographs which forever shape the world's history. What happens when these images are revisited and manipulated? Would their meanings change? Or would they remain the same? Find out more about this rendition (and a bonus game!) after the stop.

54-year old isual artist Pavel Maria Smejkal made a series of rendered images, called Fatescapes or Fateful Countries, which consists of some of the most iconic photographs in history — with their resonant subjects ‘Photoshopped’ (or digitally deleted) out of them, leaving only the scene as it might have appeared seconds before or after the photographer passed by.

“I remove the central motifs from historical documentary photographs. I use images that have become our cultural heritage, that constitute memory of nations, serve as symbols or tools of propaganda and exemplify a specific approach to photography,” Smejkal wrote in an e-mail.

These reimagined landscapes, even with heavy and obvious alterations, still remain indelible and interesting to us because they already became so familiar and remarkable to us. Their original versions are so powerful that they remain significant to us even with the subjects removed. These images are undeniably suggestive of our fateful past and are considered to be a reflections of various “moments of truth.” With these said, it is also relevant to say that the historical importance of the photographs resonate due to their iconic and moral status.

Indeed, Smejkal’s Fatescapes is a very compelling and thought-provoking series, especially for us, film photographers and Lomographers, who minimally make use of photo-manipulation applications. However, the artist provokes us to think that before and after every chaos in the world, there is always calmness and redemption… and that the human race is capable of reigniting peace.

What are your thoughts on these images? Were you able to recognize each historical photograph? Or are you clueless? No need to search elsewhere! Our Influential Photographs Series right here on Lomography’s Magazine might be able to help you figure out which is which.

A Bonus to Our Readers!

  • The first user who will able to correctly identify at least 6 correct photographs above will earn 10 Piggies!
  • The following details should be included: the photograph’s title, the photographer’s name, the country/location where the photograph was taken, and the year it was taken.
  • You may submit your answers as a comment below until Monday, January 9th, 15:00 GMT+1. Good luck! :)

Information and images on this article were derived from Lens — The New York Times and Photo Art Centrum.

written by basterda

7 comments

  1. sadmafioso

    sadmafioso

    So,
    Robert Capa's soldier just been shot.
    Vietnam War close-up execution
    Man facing tanks in Tiananman Square
    Naked child running from napalm in Vietnam
    Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima
    Dresden bombing aftermath..

    No I don't know any of the real names :)

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. domo-guy

    domo-guy

    I was just learning some of these in class... I should have paid attention to them though... :D

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  3. taranjeet

    taranjeet

    1 spain . 1936
    robert cape
    title - death of a loyalist miltiaman

    4th photo
    kerch peninsula
    january 1942
    title- grief ( the dead wont let us forget )

    photo 1 in second group
    eddie adams
    february 1 ,1968
    saigon
    title- general nguyen ngol loan executing a viet cong officer

    photo 3 in second group

    june 8, 1972
    vietnam
    nick ut
    tilte- vietnam napalm

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  4. taranjeet

    taranjeet

    photo 4 th in second group
    title- tank man
    jeff widener
    june 5 1989
    beijing

    lat photo of second group
    1994
    sudan
    kevin carter
    tilte - why didn't he help the little girl they asked

    please give me the prize i want a camera . . i need points for it . thanx

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  5. angelabording

    angelabording

    1. Robert Capa, Loyalist Militiaman at the Moment of Death, Cerro Muriano, September 5, 1936
    2. Roger Fenton, Valley of the Shadow of Death, Krym, 1855
    3. Alexander Gardner, Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter, Gettysburg, 1863
    4. Dmitri Baltermants, Grief, Kerch, January 1942
    5. Yevgeny Khaldei, Raising a flag over the Reichstag, Berlin, 1945
    6. Joe Rosenthal, Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, February 23, 1945

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  6. angelabording

    angelabording

    7. Eddie Adams, Saigon Execution, February 1, 1968
    8. John Filo, Kent State Massacre (no official title), May 4, 1970
    9. Nick Ut, The Terror of War, Vietnam, June 8, 1972
    10. Jeff Widener, Lone Man, Tiananmen Square, June 1989
    11. James Nachtwey, Lifting a dead son to carry him to a mass grave during the famine, Somalia, 1992
    12. Kevin Carter, Starving Child (no official title), Sudan, March 1993

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  7. flyboy

    flyboy

    no added value in this work ! boring - back to the original versions!

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam