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The Perilous Peaks of Naoki Ishikawa

Taking photographs of breath-taking landscapes and sceneries is something that all photographers and Lomographers busy themselves with from time to time. A Japanese photographer took this to the extreme by photographing the world's tallest peaks, among them Mt. Everest.

Photo by Naoki Ishikawa via Scai The Bathhouse

In 2000, then 23-year-old Naoki Ishikawa became one of the youngest people to have climbed the Seven Summits, the tallest mountains towering over each of the seven continents. Soon after, he decided to pursue photography professionally and went on to capture some of the most breath-taking mountain sceneries around the world.

Last year, Ishikawa, then already an established and highly regarded photographer in Japan, returned to Mt. Everest and documented his journey on film. When he climbed Mt. Everest from the Tibet side ten years ago, he saw the other climbers who took the opposite route upon reaching the peak. It was during this time that he thought of a plan—to return and climb the perilous peak through the other route. He carried out this plan in March 2011 and made his ascent from the Nepal side.

Lugging a backpack with two of his favorite medium format cameras (Makina 670 and Mamiya 7 II), 120 rolls of film, and a digital video camera, he began documenting everything, making sure to “capture as much of the climb on film as possible.” His photos were stunning, showing the start of his trek from the village of Lukla in the Nepalese mountains, to the Everest Base Camp, and finally, the astonishing summit of the world’s tallest peak.

The photos from his second ascent to Mt. Everest were showcased in an exhibit entitled “8848” held in September 2011 at Scai The Bathhouse. The title was in reference to—you guessed it—8,848 m, the elevation of the world’s highest mountain. Take a look at some more of these photos below:

All information for this article were taken from Scai The Bathhouse and Japan Times.

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written by plasticpopsicle

1 comment

  1. darlim

    darlim

    Inspiring!

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam