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LomoKino Story - Diane Sagnier Shoots a LomoKino Western

Monday, 11am. Frederic (a Lomography employee) and I started off by looking at the printed manual Lomography sent us in a Paris café close to his workplace. He had brought many different types of film. Positive, negative, different ISO levels - We wanted to try them all out! Frederic agreed to help me with the project I wanted to make for Lomography – This is the story behind my first LomoKino movie!

I really wanted to incorporate double exposures into the LomoKino movie so that’s how we began. We took out a box of birthday cake fire crackers and closed ourselves away in the Lomography bathroom to be in complete darkness- We shot the sparks from the crackers on two different films (400 ISO and 200 ISO). Then we rewound the films completely to take them out of the camera safely.

Later that afternoon, we met up with our Cowgirl near the store on Place Franz Liszt. I had brought the two fire cracker exposed rolls of film to a developing store – They took the leader of the film out of the film container again so we could put them back in the camera.

We went to a vintage looking street I had spotted a week earlier. The LomoKino was loaded with the fire cracker exposed film – We put it on a tripod, checked out the lighting and put the camera on f/8 because it looked bright enough. We did the same with the second film and then went along filming the other sequences with the other negative films. We had a lot of ruined ones from people walking into our frame! By the way, the viewfinder makes you see a bit higher than the lens so you better lower your frame a bit compared to what you see through the viewfinder.

We changed locations and decided to try out the positive films. We made a few rushes with the tripod, then I tried out holding the camera and filming at the same time which makes the image bumpy to start off with… But then you get used to the spin and it’s easier to stabilize it.

We brought the films back to the development store, asked them not to cut the films and to scan the images and give them back to us on CD. The next day, Fred went back to get them and since the images were scanned as stills (4 by 4 views), he cut them up on Photoshop and put them together with a motion software (I think Adobe Premiere Pro). He then rendered the rushes and sent them back to me. Using Adobe Premiere I put the rushes together following the scenario and soundtrack.

Friday, 6pm, I felt like I had reinvented movie making. Finally, here it is!

Bringing analogue back to the movies with a bang in the 21st century, the LomoKino is a Lomography movie camera that shoots spectacular, creative movies on all kinds of 35mm film. Head to the Microsite, watch some Movies and begin your analogue movie-making journey today!

written by Diane Sagnier

3 comments

  1. mochilis

    mochilis

    W O W!!

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. aanum

    aanum

    that's the best movie I've seen so far :)

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  3. stouf

    stouf

    Sweet !

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam

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