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New York Panoramic Images (1902-1913)

We will perform an exciting journey through New York in the early twentieth century, through panoramic images of the moment. Want to know how they made panoramic images before? Read on...

The Sprocket Rocket, Horizon Perfekt, or Spinner 360 have not always been there. There was a time that making a panoramic image (from the Greek ‘pan’, everything, and "Horam ‘view’) was considered unthinkable or impossible. For this purpose, early photographers worked with simple methods such as joining negatives for a broader panoramic and stitching the images revealed. The sequence of two consecutive images depicting spatial continuity produced good results without having to use special optical tricks or additional technology.

We should consider ourselves lucky to have now a good and cheap technology that allows us to obtain excellent results when taking panoramic images. Thanks to cameras as easy as we have mentioned (Spinner 360, Sprocket Rocket, etc.), we can get some great snapshots. Our ancestors did not have (unfortunately for them) any of these cameras and needed to sharpen the wits with simple and practical procedures.

It is very curious to see how manually joined these images, pretending to give a sense of unity by bringing together several snapshots. Undoubtedly, all manual work and providing exceptional good results for the state of technology.

Thus, we can appreciate (more or less successfully in some) more the following panoramic images of New York in the early twentieth century.

Images property of The Library of Congress.

written by jesushp and translated by jesushp

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The original version of this article is written in: Spanish. It is also available in: Português.