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Last But Not the Least: Amelia Earhart's Last Photo

At the end of May 1937, accomplished aviatrix Amelia Earhart was photographed beside her navigator Fred Noonan in Los Angeles. Unknown to the aviation pioneer and the rest of the world, the AP file photo would end up among their very last photos, as they would disappear during their final flight to circumnavigate the world.

Amelia Earhart with her Lockhead Electra 10E in 1937. Photo via Wired.com

Talk about aviation history and you’ll surely hear a name that rings a bell: Amelia Earhart. Her legacy as the first woman to make a solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean sparked the imaginations of many, resulting to the famed aviatrix earning a pop culture icon status.

The aviatrix was ambitious, determined and dauntless; after earning numerous achievements and world records in the field of aviation, there was one challenge left for Earhart to conquer: a circumnavigational flight following a laborious equatorial route.

The last photo of Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan, taken in May 1937, before they made their second attempt to complete a circumnavigational flight. Photo via Wikipedia

The first attempt flying east to west on March 17, 1937 was unsuccessful due to mechanical problems that impaired her modified Lockhead Electra 10E. At the end of May 1937, before the second attempt flying west to east was made, Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan were photographed for an AP file photo in Los Angeles. It turned out to be one of the very last photos of the accomplished aviatrix and her navigator. On July 2, 1937 the two vanished over the central Pacific Ocean somewhere near Howland Island, their target landing spot. She was declared dead in absentia at 41.

Earhart and Fred Noonan with a map of the Pacific showing the route for their final flight. Photo via e-southerndata.com

If you enjoyed this article, why not take a look at other last photographs in the Last But Not the Least series so far? Also, look forward to more installments of the series for the rest of the week!

Sources and additional readings:
Amelia Earhart — Wikipedia
July 2, 1937: Earhart Vanishes Over the Pacific — Wired.com
AP Images — Amelia Earhart

written by plasticpopsicle

1 comment

  1. 141photo

    141photo

    History is also ways good. Doog work :)
    about 3 years ago · report as spam

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Deutsch.