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Springtime Analogue Shooting in a Garden

Leaves saturated in shades of lime, asparagus, clover and olive decorate the tips of freshly awakened trees which cast their cool, shady shadows upon the earth where rainbow colored flora blooms and blossoms. It is without a question that spring has arrived in the garden. It is without a doubt that her beauty beckons and begs to be captured.

Photo by adrienne-is

Certainly you are thinking a celebratory springtime trip to a garden is soo cliché. It’s only for the fluttering winged creatures that yearn to taste honeysuckle and pollen. A flower is only a flower and the enjoyment of framing the perfect perennial photograph is a bore after soo many times before. This is likely a thought of some. Those who know differently can get lost in their garden theme photo shooting for days after the exchange of seasons.

Finding myself in the later category, I paid homage to mother nature’s gifts at the popular Marie Selby Botanical Gardens. Unsurprisingly enough I wanted to be lost in the zig-zag paths of this beautiful venue. Observing each plant life that piqued my interest, I snapped a picture or two dragging myself to have a photo affair with the next. I made an inner promise that I’d use my film sparingly so that I could seize the essence of the entire place.

During this visit I’d only taken two cameras and three rolls of film. With the exception of the Lomography Redscale film, I’d never used the Astia loaded in my Fisheye One or the Lomo X-Pro Chrome 100 ISO loaded in my Horizon Kompakt. With each click of the shutter my heart would pitter-patter at the thought of pink color shifts atop of the already pastel pink and red flowers in the trees above or on the ground below. Surely I was living in the moment and inhaling all the fresh air imaginable, but I was also holding my breath unsure of what I’d just photographed moments before.

Fast forward to my lingering post garden thoughts, there are a few things I personally wish I’d done differently.

1. I should have taken more film.
2. I should have taken a medium format camera.
3. I should have gotten lost forever.

All of the above lead me to thinking a second excursion may be worth the visit. Lucky for all of us, spring time has only arrived and our cameras are still budding.

Now that my secret garden is no longer a secret, what might be your favourite garden to shoot analogue in the spring time? Not a fan of gardens? Where then do you spring into to snap a scene of the season?

written by adrienne-is

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