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Life as a Lomosapien: LOMOgraphics

If you are an avid reader of my weekly ‘Life as a Lomosapien’ articles, you will already know that recently I have spent a lot of my time manipulating old negatives. My favourite technique to use at the minute is something I like to call ‘LOMOgraphics’, which basically involves mixing Typography and Lomography to create a piece of Graphic Design. I recently came up with this idea while trying to create some posters using my photographic negatives.

I’m not really sure why I didn’t try this particular technique sooner, as I used to do something very similar when I was at college. A few years ago I studied Graphic Design as an A-Level and believe it or not, back then we didn’t have regular use of a computer for our design work. Instead we produced a lot of our work by using a colour photocopier. If we wanted to put text onto one of our designs we would often have to photocopy our text onto acetate paper, and then position our acetate paper over our design, then we would photocopy our design again, with the acetate on top to produce an image with text.

The technique I used for the images in this article is virtually the same as the photocopier technique. I first printed out some text onto an A4 sheet of plain paper, took the print out to my nearest print shop, where I had the A4 sheet photocopied onto acetate. Most places with a photocopier should be able to copy onto acetate. I then trimmed the acetate sheet up into little rectangles, the same size as my photographic negatives. Once this is done, the acetate rectangles are placed on top of the photographic negative and loaded into a negative scanner. All you have to do now is scan your images to reveal your new pieces of LOMOgraphics.

Have a go at creating your own LOMOgraphics! If you have an image which is slightly under-exposed, try putting the acetate underneath the image rather than on top. Or put some acetate text in the sides of your fisheye shots (the parts of the negative which are not exposed to light).

Have you ever tried this effect? Or maybe you’ve tried something similar? If so, let me know! If you haven’t tried this out yet, give it a go! And post some links to your results in a comment below!

Danny Wood is the frontman of a punk rock band called The Panicstruck, he also works as a Web Designer, is a keen Lomographer and runs his own Analogue Photography Blog.

written by cruzron

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Spanish.