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Canada's Now-and-Then Series: The Maritimes

Lomography is taking over Canada, one analogue city at a time! We'll be traveling coast to coast for this series, digging into old photo albums and our online lomographic community as we reminisce the development of our beautiful Canadian cities! We've come this far, and we thought it would be a super cool idea to feature not one, but a whole BUNCH of cities for our final installment. Ladies and gents, welcome to the Maritimes!

photo by: lazerblazer

The Maritimes consist of three Canadian provinces on the East Coast: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. The reason these provinces are called the Maritimes is because they are right by water… They are “of the sea.”

Nova Scotia

In Nova Scotia, the capital city is Halifax. It is a city full of rugged shorelines, sandy beaches and beautiful gardens. Halifax was actually the first British town in Canada founded in 1749. From fishing villages to farming communities to seasonal festivals, this Atlantic city has plenty to keep you occupied.

I’m sure you all know the story of Titanic very well, but did you know that Halifax had a very intimate role with the disaster? Three Halifax ships were sent to the aftermath to recover victims in 1912. These recovered bodies were buried in a few of the city’s cemeteries with rows and rows of black granite headstones, all inscribed with the same date, April 15, 1912.

New Brunswick

Fredericton is New Brunswick’s third largest (just behind Saint John and Moncton) and capital city. The St. John river bisects the city, flowing in a west-east direction. This river is a main natural feature of the city, and has also created two distinct regions named as the “Northside” and the “Southside.” The Southside is the city’s downtown core, whereas the Northside consists of communities and boroughs. The Fredericton region is also ideal for agriculture due to its rich surroundings of water resources.

The annual Harvest Jazz & Blues Festival happens here, bringing in local, regional and international artists. The indie rock scene is also bustling here, mostly featuring jam bands. Aside from music, the arts are prominent in Fredericton. The Beaverbrook Art Gallery here is New Brunswick’s prestigious, provincial gallery which includes several paintings from Salvador Dali.

Confederation Bridge, New Brunswick, on the way to to our next destination, PEI. photo by: laphoto

Prince Edward Island

Named after Queen Charlotte, wife of George III, Charlottetown is the largest city in PEI. From a historical standpoint, Charlottetown is most famously the city of the Charlottetown Conference in 1864, the first gathering of Canadian statesmen to debate the proposed Canadian Confederation. The city is located on its namesake harbour, and is presently dominated by urban development along the waterfront while suburban development to the west, north, and east.

Fun fact: Regis Philbin & Kelly Ripa brought their “Live with Regis & Kelly” morning talk show to PEI just last year. This was not only the first ever Canadian-based episode, but this broadcast from Confederation Landing Park was the most watched episode of the series. Impressive.

photo by: mattmacq

Well. It’s been a blast! I hope you’ve learned as much as I have! Until next time my fellow Lomographers. Keep on photographing our Canadian cities!

written by ashleyaang

2 comments

  1. holydarkyfied

    holydarkyfied

    I live very near from Montréal and I just love the Maritimes. These places are perfect to go on vacation, forgetting the big city and the noise. Hope you'll talk about Québec, but not only about Montréal, about the city of Québec and I don't know north of here and maybe about the Gaspésie, anyway, have a nice day,

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. helenapie

    helenapie

    I am in Halifax riiiight NOW! woo. :) <3
    over 3 years ago · report as spam