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Jérôme Tanon: Think Kid, Think

Jerome Tanon let us in on his little secret..."How I turned from digi to analog, documenting snowboarding all around the world. Winters spent hiking in the deep snow with the heaviest backpack, freezing, waiting, riding..." Read on after the jump for more of his story.

So I’m writing this, agitating my Patterson every minute, and I recall why I started shooting film in the first place. I was a digi-kid, learned everything with digital, using flashes all-around and finding it cool to turn color shots into b&w in photoshop. Until the day I opened literally a drawer that would change my life: inside was a Brownie Starlet camera from the 1950’s that long ago belonged to my grand pa’. Damn, what’s this crazy stuff? Is it still working? And that was it. When I looked at this very first roll of negative, even though it was almost completely f*cked, I knew I would go on with this for a long time.

I had to re-learn everything, and from bits to bits, I could even shoot analog for my action snowboard shots. You know, the ones you get money for so you’re not allowed to screw-up. I found the colors and the grain so amazing that today, my digi stays at home while I go up to the mountains. Since then, my riding shots only fit the galleries and the “special photo” magazines, most of the brands find them “cool” but would never use ‘em for an ad campaign. Or when they want to, they go "Hey, we’d like to use this B&W shot but in colors and maybe less grain, can you send the RAW over ?" … uh …

Indeed, they have an excuse for not knowing that film photos still exist, since there’s so much effort put into photoshop to make digital pictures look like analog. I get fooled all the time! Nowadays with good work, you can’t tell if it’s film or not. So the question I asked myself was: now, is there a point in shooting film anymore? Of course there is. You don’t shoot film the way you shoot digital. You actually THINK before you press the button. Plus, an original painting and a perfect copy can look exactly the same for the spectator, the price never will, won´t it?

Add to this the infinite combination of different cameras X different films X different process, and you have yourself a lifetime of shooting. Off-season, I always keep a camera in my pocket when I walk the streets, waiting for something special to happen. The idea never came up when I was shooting with digital SLRs. And I love it. In the same time I try new techniques and combination for the next winter, I learn to snap the moment and not to be afraid of people.

For more pictures, check out Jérôme´s website

written by cruzron

4 comments

  1. mikahsupageek

    mikahsupageek

    fantastic gallery !

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  2. wuxiong

    wuxiong

    Amazing photos....

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  3. denbaat

    denbaat

    Brilliant story and amazing shots!
    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  4. biergoggles

    biergoggles

    I love photo number 2 in the gallery. It is absolutely fantastic.

    about 4 years ago · report as spam