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LC-A Big Book Chapter 48: Komsomolets and Lubitel: Medium Format Twin-Lens Reflex Cameras

In the prosperous years of the post-war era, another camera fought its corner, right up to the late 1980's. The "Komsomolets", which means " Young Communist", saw the light of the overcast St Petersburg's day in 1946 and was an easy-to-handle twin-lens reflex camera. The Germans provided, whether they wanted to or not, the 1938 Voigtlander "Brilliant" an exact model for the robust Amateur-cam.

54. The Lubitel 2 of 1955: this copy of a German Voigtlander became one of the most sought-after cameras across the Soviet Union and was produced until 1993. 55. LOMO PLC developed the MOMENT instant camera in 1952. Unfortunately, the plant’s chemical department couldn’t come up with a proper film emulsion and the camera was never released.

In the prosperous years of the post-war era, another camera fought its corner, right up to the late 1980’s. The “Komsomolets”, which means " Young Communist", saw the light of the overcast St Petersburg’s day in 1946 and was an easy-to-handle twin-lens reflex camera. The Germans provided, whether they wanted to or not, the 1938 Voigtlander “Brilliant” an exact model for the robust Amateur-cam. As soon as it went on the market, it was followed up by a more developed and functional version, which is well known to Lomographers around the world. The “Lubitel”, a nice sounding name that can be translated literally as “Amateur”, was launched in 1949 and proved to be a great success amongst photographers that were hungry for 120 film. Up to one million copies were produced, which was even topped by the two million models of its successor, the Lubitel 2, released in 1955. Together with the Smena, the Lubitel series became one of the most popular camera families all across the Soviet Union and was produced until 1993.

A few years earlier in 1952, the plant was ready to produce their first Polaroid camera “Moment”, inspired by the instant-camera that came out in 1947 in the United States. However, it decided to abandon production in the end. The technic was well developed, but unfortunately the chemical department could not manage the same quality that made the American Polaroid inventor Edwin Land a fortune from his invention of instantly developed photographs.

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written by ungrumpy

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Deutsch & Spanish.