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LC-A Big Book Chapter 43: 1920-1930 Glass Melting and the First Russian Sound Film

According to V.I. Lenin’s definition, the cinema had become “the most important of the arts” to the young Soviet Republic. So the country was gradually kitted out with mobile cinema projectors from our favourite St Petersburg optics manufacturer. In 1931, it was a LOMO PLC projector, “TOMP-4” that made it possible for young and old to watch the first Russian sound-film “Putyovka v zhizn” (“The Road to Life”, a melancholic film about homeless youth).

1. V.N. Churilovsky, Professor of the institute for optical sights LITMO, 1960. 2. V.S. Ignatovsky, specialist in optical in opticalm science and corresponding member of the Academy of Science in the USSR, 1930s. 3. I.A. Uvarov, former Baltic sailor, participant in the Russian Revolution and Director of the GOMZ Works from 1932 to 1939. 4. Engineer-Designer A.Y. Simonovsky who was awarded the order of the Red Star for the development of optical instrumentation in 1939. 5. M.A. Ardashnikov, Group Manager of photo equipment development in the 1980’s. 6. L.G. Titov, Director General of GOMZ until 1932, who also assembled the objective for first Russian domestic motion picture projector “Rus” in 1918.

In the following years, the factory was led by its first Red Army leader Leonid Gavrilovich Titov. This Director General was so enthusiastic about the company that he even situated his apartment on the fourth floor of the factory’s building. At this time, LOMO PLC produced mainly periscopes for submarines, binoculars, anti-aircraft range-finders and moreover ordinary eyeglasses, which helped the company to survive during the 1920s.

Revolutionary for this time was also the training of highly-qualified staff at the professional school, the Leningrad Optical and Mechanical Institute (LITMO). This school exists until this very day, and continues to produce brilliant engineers. By 1926, this institute, together with the factory and the State Optical Institute (GOI), made a veritable breakthrough in the development of optics by generating the scientific technology of glass melting. Having developed this important invention, GOZ (RAAOMP received this likeable name by 1921) was ready to go for much more sophisticated projects, and most importantly, it was able to do it independently.

By the 1920s, the factory had successfully completed its first five year plan and it was announced that GOZ was to restrict its future activities exclusively to the manufacture of cinema and photo equipment. According to V.I. Lenin’s definition, the cinema had become “the most important of the arts” to the young Soviet Republic. So the country was gradually kitted out with mobile cinema projectors from our favourite St Petersburg optics manufacturer. In 1931, it was a LOMO PLC projector, “TOMP-4” that made it possible for young and old to watch the first Russian sound-film “Putyovka v zhizn” (“The Road to Life”, a melancholic film about homeless youth).

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written by ungrumpy

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Spanish & Deutsch.