Lumen Printing


A simple printing technique that is ideal for using old expired photographic paper.

Explore your garden or local park for nature material, flowers, leaves, seeds are ideal.

In darkroom, place plant material on old photographic paper, using a backboard and place sheet of glass over top. Printing out frames are ideal, but can crease single weight paper. Expose in sunlight for 50 to 60 minutes. Go and set up wash and fix bath, then have a cup of tea. Return print to darkroom, wash in water(optional) then use fix bath for three minutes. Follow with 5 minute wash for RC paper, or 30 minutes for fibre paper.
Dry overnight. Scan print and you will have an interesting result. Different papers produce different tones. Ilford bromo paper produces a pink/grey; Agfa Brovira gives a light tan, while Forte Polywarmtone produces an orange/red. Ilford contact printing paper produces a gold. Paper imperfections can add texture and varied tones to the print

Fresh blooms and green leaves give varied tones due to differing density. Spray with water or use early morning dew to strengthen tonality The hour exposure also gives a modelling effect from shadow movement. Try using anything opaque from a $2 shop; artificial stuff like glass or plastic. Mix and match natural and artificial materials
So leave your camera behind and try this simple sun print. The challenge in this process is arranging materials in subdued light into an interesting composition.

written by lomodesbro on 2011-04-09 in #gear #tipster #ilford-paper #photogram #sun-print #lab-rat #top-tipster-techniques #tipster #lumen-print #agfa #forte


  1. kylewis
    kylewis ·

    I've been doing workshops on these, wish I'd thought to do a tipster! I don't bother with the darkroom, straight out there in the wild!

  2. stouf
    stouf ·

    Sweet !

  3. orangeuke
    orangeuke ·

    great results!

  4. sasko
    sasko ·

    gonna try that!

  5. fash_on
    fash_on ·

    like Talbots botanicals :)

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