Lomopedia: Olympus Trip AF 50/51

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A simple point-and-shoot camera from the 2000s, the Olympus Trip AF 50 follows the "Trip" tradition of providing travelers with a fuss-free shooting experience for documenting their adventures. Find out more about this modern Olympus Trip camera in this installment of Lomopedia!

One of the last few models in the long-running Trip Series of auto focus point-and-shoot cameras by Olympus, the Trip AF 50 was introduced in the 2000s as a more modern offering for holiday snapshooters who wanted “auto-focus everything” for fuss-free travel photography. Its 28mm wide-angle made this Trip model a fun and reliable travel companion for beautiful landscape, group, and party photos, as we can see in many of the photos taken by our fellow lomographers with it so far! A self-timer was eventually added to this camera, and was subsequently named Trip AF 51.

Photo via Nighted

Technical Specifications:

  • Type: 35mm autofocus, lens-shutter camera
  • Film Format: 35mm standard DX-coded film (24mm x 36mm)
  • Lens: Olympus 28mm, f5.6, 3 elements in 3 groups
  • Shutter: 1/100 sec.
  • Viewfinder: Reverse Galilean-type viewfinder
  • Focusing: Autofocus
  • Exposure Control: Progressive type
  • Self-Timer: None for AF 50; Yes for AF 51
  • Remote Control (Optional): n/a
  • Flash: Built-in flash with Red-eye Reduction lamp, flash is automatically activated under low light conditions
  • All Weather: n/a
  • Quartz Date: Yes
  • Panorama: n/a
  • Print Type: n/a
  • Focusing Range: 2.6ft. (0.8m) – infinity
  • Exposure Counter: automatic reset
  • Exposure Compensation: n/a
  • Film Speed: Automatic setting with DX-coded film (IS0 100-400), for non-DX coded film, film speed is fixed at ISO 100
  • Film Loading: Automatic loading (automatically advances to first frame when back cover is closed)
  • Film Advance: Automatic film winding
  • Film Rewind: Automatic film rewind (automatic rewind activation at end of film, automatic rewind stop).
  • Data Recording: Data recorded on image, displayed on LCD panel
  • Formats: No data, Year-month-day, Month-day-year, Day-month-year, Day-hour-minute
  • Diopter Adjustment: n/a
  • Power Source: Two 1.5V AA alkaline (LR6) batteries
  • Battery Check: n/a
  • Dimensions: 111.5(W) x 64.5(H) x 42mm(D) excluding protrusions
  • Weight: 152 g (without batteries)
  • Data Coding: n/a
Credits: msmlska, kbobiles & meshcheryakov

All information for this article were sourced from Olympus America Website, Olympus Asia Website and Camerapedia.

written by plasticpopsicle on 2014-05-07 in #reviews

One Comment

  1. robotmonkey1996
    robotmonkey1996 ·

    Does the camera lag for a second when you push the button or is it instant?

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