Lomopedia: Voigtlander Bessa R2A

2

Introduced in 2004, the Bessa R2A and R3A are 35mm autoexposure rangefinder cameras that belong to Cosina's line of Voigtlander revival cameras. Find out more about these luxurious-looking analogue rangefinder snappers in this installment of Lomopedia!

The Voigtlander Bessa R2A and R3A 35mm rangefinder cameras are improved versions of the Bessa R2, equipped with the Leica M mount, center-weighted TTL light meter, and aperture-priority automatic exposure which can also be switched to manual exposure. The R2A has a viewfinder with 0.7x magnification and 35/50/75/90 frame lines, while the R3A has a viewfinder with 1x magnification and 40/50/75/90 frame lines. These cameras, however, have electronic shutters, which means they cannot be operated without batteries.

Photo via CameraQuest

Technical Specifications:

  • Type: 35mm camera with focal plane shutter an TTL metering system
  • Film Format: 35mm film, 24×36 mm
  • Lens Mount: VM Mount
  • Shutter: Vertically moving electronic metal focal plane shutter B, 1-1/2000sec. (B, 8-1/2000 sec. With Auto Mode)
  • Focusing: Coincidence type. Infinity – 0.7m
  • Finder magnification: X 0.7
  • Bright frames: 35mm, 50mm, 75mm, 90mm
  • Exposure display: By LED indicator in view finder, AE lock by AE lock button
  • Exposure Metering System: Center-weighted average metering.
  • Exposure Coupling Range: EV1 – 19 (ISO100, F4,: 1sec.- F16, 1/2000sec.)
  • Flash Terminal: X synchronic contact, synchronized at 1/125 sec or lower speed
  • Film Advance: By single and/or multiple racheting lever action. Double exposure lock system. 120 throw and 45 stand off. Trigger winder available also optional extra.
  • Film Rewind: By film rewind button and film rewind crank
  • Frame Counter: Additive type with autoreset by opening the back cover
  • Film Speed Range: ISO 25 – 3200 by 1/3 steps
  • Power Source: Two 1.5V Alkaline batteries (LR44) or Silver batteries (SR 44)
  • Dimensions: 135(W)x81(H)x33(D)mm
  • Weight: 430g
Credits: ksears119, gusano, frauspatzi & jackpacker

All information for this article were soured from Voigtlander's Website, Camerapedia, and CameraQuest.

written by plasticpopsicle on 2014-04-15 in #reviews #autoexposure #bessa #rangefinder #voigtlander #voigtlander-bessa-r2a-lomopedia #rangefinder-camera

2 Comments

  1. saintempire
    saintempire ·

    still my main camera after all those years!
    using it waaaaaay more than my leica M5 :)) great to read some praise about this gem

  2. ksears119
    ksears119 ·

    I have been using my Bessa R2A since September, 2013 and love it. I have the the Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 lens and primarily use Ilford HP5 film. I can't say enough good things about that combination.

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