Lomopedia: Olympus OM2000

2

The last OM body produced by Olympus, the Olympus OM2000 was released in 1997. Despite the OM series being a popular line, this particular model did not fare well with Olympus fans. Find out why in this installment of Lomopedia!

Produced from 1997 to 2002, the Olympus OM2000 was the last OM body released by the camera maker for its popular OM series of 35mm SLR cameras. However, it was not well-received by Olympus fans, mainly because it was a cheaper body manufactured by Cosina, and was thus not considered by many as a true OM body.

While the anthracite-colored OM2000 can accommodate Olympus OM lenses and accessories that can be attached to the viewfinder, the rest, such as motor drives, finder screens, and data backs are not compatible. Also, it lacks the shutter speed ring around the bayonet mount, which was the OM’s distinctive feature. Instead, the shutter speed knob was placed on the OM2000’s top plate.

Even so, many consider the OM2000 as an economical camera for use with OM lenses. Its features include mechanical shutter and manual exposure with spot metering, top shutter speed of 1/2000 sec, flash sync speed of 1/125, and an exposure meter that can be switched to center-weighted metering to spot metering. It was also introduced with the 35 – 70mm f/3.5 – 4.8 and 210mm f/4.5 – 5.6 S-Zuiko zoom lenses which were also made by Cosina.

Photo via The Digital Visual

Technical Specifications:

  • Type: 35 mm SLR camera with focal plane shutter
  • Film format: 24 mm x 36 mm
  • Lens Mount: Olympus OM mount
  • Shutter: Mechanically controlled focal-plane shutter (vertical action)
  • Shutter speed: B, 1 – 1/2000 sec
  • Flash-shutter synchronization speed: X contact only. Synchronizes at 1/125 sec. or slower shutter speed
  • Light metering system: SPD. Center-weighted average light metering. Spot metering.
  • Light metering range: +2 EV – 19 EV (ISO 100)
  • Exposure control system: Obtained by matching green LED
  • Connection to flash: Hot shoe only
  • Film Speed: ISO 25 – 3200 (1/3 increment; manually controlled)
  • Film Advance: Film advance lever (locks shutter release when pushed in; does not allow several short strokes)
  • Exposure Counter: Progressive type with automatic reset by opening back cover
  • Multi-Exposure: By operating multi-exposure lever
  • Viewfinder: Fixed focus screen. Split-image microprism system. Finder view field – 93% of actual picture field; Magnification – 0.84X with 50mm lens
  • Viewfinder Information: Activated when shutter release button is pressed halfway
  • Self-timer: Mechanical type with approx. 10-sec delay
  • Battery check:
    Activated when shutter release button is pressed halfway. Power is sufficient when LED inside viewfinder lights and low when it does not light.
  • Power source: Two SR44 silver oxide or LR44 alkaline-manganese batteries.
  • Dimensions: 138 (W) x 87 (H) x 51 (D) mm (5.4 X 3.4 X 2.0 in) body only
  • Weight: 430 g (15.2 oz) body only
Credits: leolensen

All information for this article were sourced from Camerapedia and Camera Manuals.

written by plasticpopsicle on 2014-04-02 in #reviews

2 Comments

  1. leolensen
    leolensen ·

    Reading a article about your favorite camera and looking at the photos realizing they're all yours... Excellent! :D

  2. plasticpopsicle
    plasticpopsicle ·

    You have some excellent photos that make good visuals for this installment, @leolensen! :)

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